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Rheumatology International

, Volume 39, Issue 12, pp 2185–2187 | Cite as

Brucellosis as a rare cause of olecranon bursitis: case-based review

  • Seyed Mokhtar Esmaeilnejad-Ganji
  • Mohammad Reza Hasanjani Roushan
  • Soheil Ebrahimpour
  • Arefeh BabazadehEmail author
Cases with a Message
  • 71 Downloads

Abstract

A 51-year-old man shepherd presented with mild pain and swelling of the right posterior aspect of his right elbow. In ultrasonography, the affected bursal space had swelling and effusion. Moreover, the aspiration of the affected bursa revealed an inflammatory profile. Brucella melitensis was detected in aspirated fluid and blood cultures. The serum agglutination test (SAT) and 2-mercaptoethanol test for brucellosis were also positive. Therefore, the diagnosis of brucellar olecranon was confirmed. Treatment was initiated using gentamicin for the first 7 days and doxycycline plus rifampicin for 2 months. After treatment, all clinical signs and symptoms were resolved. No relapse was seen after 1 year of the completion of treatment. Clinicians should pay attention to the symptoms of olecranon brucellar bursitis that is similar to that of pyogenic bursitis.

Keywords

Brucellosis Bursitis Olecranon 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank to all personnel’s of the department of Infectious Diseases, Tropical Medicine Research Center of Babol University of Medical Sciences for their help for reporting this case, and Dr Evangelina Foronda for English editing.

Author contributions

The case was diagnosed and followed up by SMEG and MRHR, and SE conceived and planned the case report. MRHR and AB wrote the manuscript. The final version was read, corrected, and approved by all authors. All co-authors take full responsibility of the integrity of the case study and literature review.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Informed consent

Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of the current case report.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OrthopedicsBabol University of Medical SciencesBabolIslamic Republic of Iran
  2. 2.Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Health Research InstituteBabol University of Medical SciencesBabolIslamic Republic of Iran

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