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Use of high-resolution vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of temporal arteritis

  • Diogo Goulart CorrêaEmail author
  • Diogo Galheigo de Oliveira e Silva
  • Luiz Celso Hygino da CruzJr.
Correspondence
  • 9 Downloads

Dear Editor,

We read with great interest the article by Keser and Aksu [1] published in Rheumatology International, entitled “Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitides”, in which the authors provided an excellent review of diagnostic criteria and the differential diagnosis of Takayasu and giant cell arteritis. We would like to discuss the role of high-resolution vessel wall imaging, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique not mentioned by the authors, in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis and secondary superficial temporal arteritis. We present two cases of temporal arteritis caused by giant cell arteritis and varicella zoster virus infection, respectively.

A 55-year-old man presented with a history of recent-onset headache that worsened when the left temporal region was touched, associated with neck and bilateral shoulder pain. Laboratory tests revealed an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The patient had no skin lesion. 3-T MRI showed no brain...

Notes

Acknowledgements

The present work was carried out with the support of CNPq, National Council of Scientific and Technological Development—Brazil.

Author contributions

CDG: substantial contributions to the conception of the work, acquisition of data for the work; drafting the work; final approval of the version to be published; agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved; SDGO: substantial contributions to the design of the work; analysis and interpretation of data for the work; revising the work critically for important intellectual content; final approval of the version to be published; agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved; CLCH: substantial contributions to the design of the work; analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; revising the work critically for important intellectual content; final approval of the version to be published; agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

Funding

No funding was received for this study.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Diogo Goulart Corrêa declares that he has no conflict of interest. Diogo Galheigo de Oliveira e Silva declares that he has no conflict of interest. Luiz Celso Hygino da Cruz Jr. declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem (CDPI)Rio de JaneiroBrazil
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyHospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Federal University of Rio de JaneiroRio de JaneiroBrazil

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