Rheumatology International

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 1469–1473 | Cite as

Effect of biofeedback and deep oscillation on Raynaud’s phenomenon secondary to systemic sclerosis: results of a controlled prospective randomized clinical trial

  • Birte Sporbeck
  • Kirsten Mathiske-Schmidt
  • Silke Jahr
  • Dörte Huscher
  • Mike Becker
  • Gabriela Riemekasten
  • Ines Taufmann
  • Gerd-Rüdiger Burmester
  • Stephanie Pögel
  • Anett Reisshauer
Short Communication

Abstract

Our aim was to evaluate the effect of deep oscillation and biofeedback on Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP) secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc). A prospective randomized study was performed in SSc patients receiving either deep oscillation (n = 10) or biofeedback (n = 8) thrice a week for 4 weeks, or patients were randomized into the waiting group untreated for vasculopathy (n = 10) in time of running the study interventions. Biofeedback resulted in an improvement of RP as determined by score reduction of visual analogue scale compared with patients of the control group (P < 0.05), whereas deep oscillation revealed a tendency for improvement (P = 0.055). The study underlines the beneficial role of physiotherapy for the treatment of SSc-related RP.

Keywords

Biofeedback Raynaud’s phenomenon Deep oscillation Systemic sclerosis Physiotherapy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The study was supported by grants from Physiomed Elektromedizin AG, Schnaittach/Laipersdorf, Germany. The authors disclose that the views of the funding body have not influenced the content of the paper.

Conflict of interest

The authors disclose that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Birte Sporbeck
    • 1
  • Kirsten Mathiske-Schmidt
    • 1
  • Silke Jahr
    • 1
  • Dörte Huscher
    • 3
  • Mike Becker
    • 2
  • Gabriela Riemekasten
    • 2
  • Ines Taufmann
    • 1
  • Gerd-Rüdiger Burmester
    • 2
  • Stephanie Pögel
    • 1
  • Anett Reisshauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationCharité University HospitalBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Department of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyCharité University HospitalBerlinGermany
  3. 3.German Rheumatism Research CentreBerlinGermany

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