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Rheumatology International

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 265–267 | Cite as

Multiple bone fracture due to Fanconi’s syndrome in primary Sjögren’s syndrome complicated with organizing pneumonia

  • Hideki Nakamura
  • Junko Kita
  • Atsushi Kawakami
  • Satoshi Yamasaki
  • Hiroaki Ida
  • Noriho Sakamoto
  • Akira Furusu
  • Katsumi Eguchi
Case Report

Abstract

A 66-year-old woman showing renal dysfunction with elevated serum alkaline phosphatase and anti-SS-A antibody was admitted. A labial salivary gland biopsy showing infiltration of mononuclear cells and positive anti-SS-A antibody with sicca symptoms led to a diagnosis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). Fanconi’s syndrome was diagnosed by renal tubular acidosis along with renal glucosuria or aminoaciduria and multiple bone fractures on bone scintigraphy. Typical bilateral pulmonary shadows were confirmed as organizing pneumonia (OP) determined by the analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and transbronchial lung biopsy. A rare complication of Fanconi’s syndrome with OP in SS is described.

Keywords

Sjögren’s syndrome Multiple bone fractures Fanconi’s syndrome Renal tubular acidosis Organizing pneumonia 

Abbreviations

CT

Computed tomography

BALF

Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid

OP

Organizing pneumonia

SS

Sjögren’s syndrome

RTA

Renal tubular acidosis

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideki Nakamura
    • 1
  • Junko Kita
    • 1
  • Atsushi Kawakami
    • 1
  • Satoshi Yamasaki
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Ida
    • 1
  • Noriho Sakamoto
    • 2
  • Akira Furusu
    • 2
  • Katsumi Eguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit of Translational Medicine, Department of Immunology and RheumatologyNagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesNagasaki CityJapan
  2. 2.Second Department of Internal MedicineNagasaki University School of MedicineNagasakiJapan

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