Current Genetics

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 112–119

Characterization of a galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase gene from the marine red alga Gracilaria gracilis

  • A. O. Lluisma
  • M. A. Ragan
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s002940050374

Cite this article as:
Lluisma, A. & Ragan, M. Curr Genet (1998) 34: 112. doi:10.1007/s002940050374

Abstract

The metabolism of D-galactose is a major feature of red-algal physiology. We have cloned and sequenced a gene from the red alga Gracilaria gracilis that encodes a key enzyme of D-galactose metabolism, galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). This gene, designated GgGALT1, is apparently devoid of introns. A potential TATA box, four potential CAAT boxes, and a repeated sequence occur in the 5′-flanking region. The predicted 369-aa peptide shares significant sequence similarity with GALTs from other organisms (human, 47%; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 49%; Solanum tuberosum, 49%). Southern-hybridization analysis reveals two related, but apparently not identical, GALT genes in the nuclear genome of G. gracilis. Sequence analysis indicates that the GgGALT1 enzyme lacks a rubredoxin “knuckle” motif, which in bacterial and fungal GALTs is involved in binding zinc. An open reading frame encoding a potential peptidyl tRNA hydrolase occurs 179 bp downstream from the GgGALT1 gene.

Key wordsGracilaria gracilis Rhodophyceae Galactose metabolism Nuclear gene Uridylyltransferase 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. O. Lluisma
    • 1
  • M. A. Ragan
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Marine Biosciences, National Research Council of Canada, 1411 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3Z1 and Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1CA
  2. 2.Institute for Marine Biosciences, National Research Council of Canada, 1411 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 3Z1 and Canadian Institute for Advanced Research in Evolutionary Biology e-mail: mark.ragan@nrc.ca Tel.: +1-902-426 1674 Fax: +1-902-426 9413CA

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