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Adipates of poly(propylene oxide-co-tetrahydrofuran) as a novel base stock for varied lube applications

  • Aruna Kukrety
  • Tarun K. Sarkar
  • Ekta Faujdar
  • Raj K. Singh
  • Suman L. Jain
  • Siddharth S. Ray
Original Paper
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

Three biodegradable polyalkylene glycols containing 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 mol% fraction of propylene oxide and tetrahydrofuran were synthesized and denoted as 1,1-PTH, 1,2-PTH and 1,4-PTH. The synthesized polyalkylene glycols were subsequently treated with adipic acid to get desired esters. At first, three different copolymers of propylene oxide and tetrahydrofuran, namely 1,1-PTH, 1,2-PTH and 1,4-PTH (polyglycol containing 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 mol% fraction of PO and THF), with molecular weights 564.0, 838.6 and 1070.7 were synthesized. Then, the esterification of the synthesized polyglycols was carried out using p-toluenesulfonic acid as the catalyst and toluene as a solvent. The obtained esters 1,1-PTHAD, 1,2-PTHAD and 1,4-PTHAD were observed to have the molecular weights 1292.1, 1705.0 and 2201.1, respectively. After molecular and physicochemical characterizations, the tribological properties were also evaluated. A comparison of the properties of these esters was made, and it was found that 1,1-PTHAD, 1,2-PTHAD and 1,4-PTHAD are favorably used as metalworking fluid, industrial gear oil and compressor lubricant base oil, respectively.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Propylene oxide Copolymer Esterification Tetrahydrofuran Compressor lubricant Base oil Metalworking fluid Industrial gear oil 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author kindly acknowledges the Director, IIP, for his kind permission to publish these results. The author thanks the Analytical Division of the Institute for providing analysis. CSIR, New Delhi, is acknowledged for research funding. One of the co-authors Dr. Tarun Kanti Sarkar acknowledged DST-SERB for financial help, file no. PDF/2017/002682.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aruna Kukrety
    • 1
  • Tarun K. Sarkar
    • 1
  • Ekta Faujdar
    • 2
  • Raj K. Singh
    • 2
  • Suman L. Jain
    • 1
  • Siddharth S. Ray
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Science DivisionCSIR-Indian Institute of PetroleumDehradunIndia
  2. 2.Analytical Science DivisionCSIR-Indian Institute of PetroleumDehradunIndia

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