Polymer Bulletin

, 64:99 | Cite as

Morphology of composite particles of single wall carbon nanotubes/biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates prepared by spray drying

  • Seok Il Yun
  • Victor Lo
  • Johannes Noorman
  • Joel Davis
  • Robert A. Russell
  • Peter J. Holden
  • Gerry E. Gadd
Original Paper

Abstract

Spray drying was investigated as a strategy for producing single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer composites. The spray-drying method produced SWCNT/poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and SWCNT/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) composite particles in which the SWCNTs have been trapped in a well-dispersed state throughout the polymer matrix. Increasing SWCNT content in the composite led to a change in particle morphology from spherical and smooth to rosette shape with angular distortions. The technique shows potential for bulk carbon composite fabrication.

Keywords

SWCNT Composites PHB PHO Spray drying Powder Biodegradable 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seok Il Yun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Victor Lo
    • 1
  • Johannes Noorman
    • 1
  • Joel Davis
    • 1
  • Robert A. Russell
    • 1
  • Peter J. Holden
    • 1
  • Gerry E. Gadd
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Nuclear Science and Technology OrganisationSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Jeonju Institute of Machinery and Carbon CompositesJeonjuRepublic of Korea

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