Informatik-Spektrum

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 58–68 | Cite as

Towards a Semantic Driven Framework for Smart Grid Applications: Model-Driven Development Using CIM, IEC 61850 and IEC 61499

HAUPTBEITRAG TOWARDS SEMANTIC DRIVEN FRAMEWORK

Abstract

Power and energy systems are on the verge of a profound change where Smart Grid solutions will enhance their efficiency and flexibility. Advanced ICT and control systems are key elements of the Smart Grid to enable efficient integration of a high amount of renewable energy resources which in turn are seen as key elements of the future energy system. The corresponding distribution grids have to become more flexible and adaptable as the current ones in order to cope with the upcoming high share of energy from distributed renewable sources.

The complexity of Smart Grids requires to consider and imply many components when a new application is designed. However, a holistic ICT-based approach for modelling, designing and validating Smart Grid developments is missing today. The goal of this paper therefore is to discuss an advanced design approach and the corresponding information model, covering system, application, control and communication aspects of Smart Grids.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Filip Andrén
    • 1
  • Matthias Stifter
    • 2
  • Thomas Strasser
    • 1
  1. 1.Energy Department – Electric Energy SystemsAIT Austrian Institute of TechnologyViennaAustria
  2. 2.Energy Department – Complex Energy SystemsAIT Austrian Institute of TechnologyViennaAustria

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