Advertisement

Current Microbiology

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 80–87 | Cite as

Genetic Diversity of Bacillus cereus/B. thuringiensis Isolates from Natural Sources

  • Erlendur  Helgason
  • Dominique A.  Caugant
  • Marguerite-M.  Lecadet
  • Yahua  Chen
  • Jacques  Mahillon
  • Ann  Lövgren
  • Ida  Hegna
  • Kirsti  Kvaløy
  • Anne-Brit  Kolstø

Abstract.

The genetic diversity and relationships among 154 Bacillus cereus/B. thuringiensis isolates recovered from soil samples from five geographic areas in Norway were investigated with multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE). Cluster analysis revealed two major groups (designated cluster I and cluster II) separated at genetic distance greater than 0.55. Cluster I included 62 electrophoretic types (ETs) originating from all five locations, whereas, in cluster II, all but one isolate were from the same location. The isolates were also serotyped with B. thuringiensis flagellar antisera, and 28 distinct serotypes were identified. In general, serotyping did not show correlation to the genetic diversity of the isolates. The presence of IS231- and IS240-like transposable elements was detected in 14% of the strains of cluster II only. Parasporal crystals were observed in three strains; ten other strains were toxic to Trichoplusia ni. We conclude that B. cereus/B. thuringiensis from soil exhibit a high degree of recombination.

Keywords

Enzyme Genetic Diversity Recombination Soil Sample Electrophoresis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erlendur  Helgason
    • 1
  • Dominique A.  Caugant
    • 2
  • Marguerite-M.  Lecadet
    • 3
  • Yahua  Chen
    • 4
  • Jacques  Mahillon
    • 4
  • Ann  Lövgren
    • 5
  • Ida  Hegna
    • 1
  • Kirsti  Kvaløy
    • 1
  • Anne-Brit  Kolstø
    • 1
  1. 1.Biotechnology Centre of Oslo and Institute of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, PB1125, 0316 Oslo 3, Norway NO
  2. 2.Department of Bacteriology, National Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo, Norway NO
  3. 3.Bactéries Entomopathogénes, Institut Pasteur, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France FR
  4. 4.Laboratoire de Génétique Microbienne, Université catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium BE
  5. 5.Department of Microbiology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden SE

Personalised recommendations