Current Microbiology

, Volume 61, Issue 1, pp 25–28

Anti N1 Cross-Protecting Antibodies Against H5N1 Detected in H1N1 Infected People

  • E. Frobert
  • M. Bouscambert-Duchamp
  • V. Escuret
  • S. Mundweiler
  • M. Barthélémy
  • F. Morfin
  • M. Valette
  • C. Gerdil
  • B. Lina
  • O. Ferraris
Article

Abstract

The A(H5N1) influenza virus pandemic may be the result of avian H5N1 adapting to humans, leading to massive human to human transmission in a context of a lack of pre-existing immunity. As A(H1N1) and A(H5N1) share the same neuraminidase subtype, anti-N1 antibodies subsequent to H1N1 infections or vaccinations may confer some protection against A(H5N1). We analysed, by microneutralization assay, the A/Vietnam/1194/04 (H5N1) anti-N1 cross-protection acquired either during A/NewCaledonia/20/99 (H1N1) infection or vaccination. In cases with documented H1N1 infection, H5N1 cross-protection could be observed only in patients born between 1930 and 1950. No such protection was detected in the sera of vaccinated individuals.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Frobert
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Bouscambert-Duchamp
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • V. Escuret
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Mundweiler
    • 2
  • M. Barthélémy
    • 2
  • F. Morfin
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Valette
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • C. Gerdil
    • 4
  • B. Lina
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • O. Ferraris
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Virologie, Centre de Biologie et de Pathologie EstHospices Civils de LyonBron CedexFrance
  2. 2.Virologie et Pathologie Humaine—CNRS FRE 3011, Faculté de Médecine RTH LaënnecUniversité Claude Bernard Lyon 1Lyon Cedex 08France
  3. 3.CNR des virus Influenza France sud, Hospices Civils de LyonCentre de Biologie et de Pathologie EstBron CedexFrance
  4. 4.Research and Development DepartmentSanofi PasteurMarcy l’EtoileFrance

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