Current Microbiology

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 0093–0101

Wolbachia Infections of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci

  • Androniki Nirgianaki
  • Gina K. Banks
  • Donald R. Frohlich
  • Zoe Veneti
  • Henk R. Braig
  • Thomas A. Miller
  • Ian D. Bedford
  • Peter G. Markham
  • Charalambos Savakis
  • Kostas Bourtzis

Abstract

We report the first systematic survey for the presence of Wolbachia endosymbionts in aphids and whiteflies, particularly different populations and biotypes of Bemisia tabaci. Additional agriculturally important species included were predator species, leafhoppers, and lepidopterans. We used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection assay with ribosomal 16S rDNA and Wolbachia cell surface protein (wsp) gene primers. Wolbachia were detected in a number of whitefly populations and species, whitefly predators, and one leafhopper species; however, none of the aphid species tested were found infected. Single, double, and triple infections were detected in some of the B. tabaci populations. PCR and phylogenetic analysis of wsp gene sequences indicated that all Wolbachia strains found belong to group B. Topologies of the optimal tree derived by maximum likelihood (ML) and a ML tree in which Wolbachia sequences from B. tabaci are constrained to be monophyletic are significantly different. Our results indicate that there have been at least four independent Wolbachia infection events in B. tabaci. The importance of the presence of Wolbachia infections in B. tabaci is discussed. RID=”” ID=”” <E5>Correspondence to: </E5>K. Bourtzis; <E5>email:</E5> kbourtz&commat;cc.uoi.gr

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Androniki Nirgianaki
    • 1
  • Gina K. Banks
    • 3
  • Donald R. Frohlich
    • 4
  • Zoe Veneti
    • 1
  • Henk R. Braig
    • 5
  • Thomas A. Miller
    • 6
  • Ian D. Bedford
    • 3
  • Peter G. Markham
    • 3
  • Charalambos Savakis
    • 1
  • Kostas Bourtzis
    • 1
  1. 1.Insect Molecular Genetics Group, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, FORTH-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, Heraklion 71110, Crete, PO Box 1527, GreeceGR
  2. 2.Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 711 10, Crete, GreeceGR
  3. 3.John Innes Centre Norwich Research Park, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UH, UKGB
  4. 4.Department of Biology, University of St. Thomas, 3800 Montrose Blvd., Houston TX 77006, USAUS
  5. 5.School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales Bangor, Bangor, LL57 2UW UKGB
  6. 6.Entomology Department, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521-0314, USAUS
  7. 7.Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Ioannina, 2 Seferi St., Agrinio 30100, GreeceGR

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