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The Mathematical Intelligencer

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 46–54 | Cite as

Feynman Diagrams as Models

  • Michael StöltznerEmail author
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Notes

Acknowledgments

My work on Feynman diagrams started with Jim Talbert's senior thesis and a visit at the University of Bielefeld during the summer of 2012. Subsequent work took place within the context of the DFG-research unit “Epistemology of the LHC,” during my Sabbatical at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy, and it was finished during a stay at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology. I am deeply indebted to members of the respective groups and to all those commenting on my paper at the 2015 Oberwolfach meeting. I am also indebted to David Rowe and Adrian Wüthrich for comments on a previous version of this article.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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