The Mathematical Intelligencer

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 56–62

3D Printing for Mathematical Visualisation

Mathematical Entertainments Michael Kleber and Ravi Vakil, Editors

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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