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Springer Seminars in Immunopathology

, Volume 26, Issue 1–2, pp 31–56 | Cite as

Stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of advanced solid tumors

  • Yago NietoEmail author
  • Roy B Jones
  • Elizabeth J Shpall
Original Paper

Abstract

Over the past two decades, high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) has been explored for a variety of solid tumors in adults, particularly breast cancer, ovarian cancer and non-seminomatous germ-cell tumors. The results of prospective phase II studies seemed superior in many cases to the outcome expected with standard-dose chemotherapy (SDC). The value of HDC for adult solid tumors remains, in most instances, a controversial issue, currently under the scrutiny of randomized phase III trial evaluation. ASCT pursuing an immune graft-versus-tumor effect has been evaluated in recent years for patients with advanced and refractory solid malignancies. This article reviews the results of the main phase II and III studies of HDC with ASCT, as well as the preliminary experience using allogeneic transplantation for solid tumors.

Keywords

High-dose chemotherapy Autologous stem-cell transplantation Solid tumor Standard-dose chemotherapy Allogeneic transplantation 

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© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA
  2. 2.MD Anderson Cancer CenterUniversity of TexasHoustonUSA

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