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Annals of Hematology

, Volume 98, Issue 3, pp 595–603 | Cite as

Detection of AML-specific mutations in pediatric patient plasma using extracellular vesicle–derived RNA

  • Fabienne Kunz
  • Evangelia Kontopoulou
  • Katarina Reinhardt
  • Maren Soldierer
  • Sarah Strachan
  • Dirk Reinhardt
  • Basant Kumar ThakurEmail author
Original Article
  • 222 Downloads

Abstract

Despite high remission rates, almost 25% of patients with AML will suffer relapse 3–5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, in addition to existing diagnostic and MRD detection tools, there is still a need for the development of novel approaches that can provide information on the state of the disease. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), containing genetic material reflecting the status of the parental cell, have gained interest in recent years as potential diagnostic biomarkers in cancer. Therefore, isolation and characterization of blood and bone marrow plasma-derived EVs from pediatric AML patients could be an additional approach in AML diagnostics and disease monitoring. In this study, we attempt to establish a plasma EV-RNA-based method to detect leukemia-specific FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations using established leukemia cell lines and primary pediatric AML plasma samples. We were successfully able to detect FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations in the EV-RNA using GeneScan-based fragment-length analysis and real-time PCR assays, respectively, in samples before therapy. This was corresponding to the gDNA mutational analysis from leukemic blasts, and supports the potential of using EV-RNA as a diagnostic biomarker in pediatric AML.

Keywords

Extracellular vesicles RNA Pediatric AML Biomarker 

Notes

Authors’ contributions

Conception and design: BKT, FK, EK; collection and assembly of data: FK, EK, KR, MS; data analysis and interpretation: BKT, FK, EK; drafting of manuscript: BKT, FK, EK, SS; manuscript writing: BKT, FK, EK, SS; final approval of manuscript: all co-authors.

Funding

This study was supported by the José Carreras Leukemia Foundation promotion grant 04 PSG/2017 awarded to Fabienne Kunz and Stiftung Universitätsmedizin Essen grant on cancer exosome research awarded to Dr. Basant Kumar Thakur.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants (or their parents) included in the study. Each patient consented following institutional review board approval AML-BFM 2004 (3VCreutzig1).

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Statement on the welfare of animals

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

277_2019_3608_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1 mb)
ESM 1 (PDF 1047 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fabienne Kunz
    • 1
  • Evangelia Kontopoulou
    • 1
  • Katarina Reinhardt
    • 1
  • Maren Soldierer
    • 1
  • Sarah Strachan
    • 1
  • Dirk Reinhardt
    • 1
  • Basant Kumar Thakur
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Hematology and OncologyUniversity Hospital EssenEssenGermany

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