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Annals of Hematology

, Volume 95, Issue 6, pp 985–991 | Cite as

Genotyping of 22 blood group antigen polymorphisms and establishing a national recipient registry in the Korean population

  • Yun Ji Hong
  • Yousun Chung
  • Sang Mee Hwang
  • Jeong Su Park
  • Jeong-Ran Kwon
  • Young Sill Choi
  • Jun Nyun Kim
  • Dong Han Lee
  • So-Yong Kwon
  • Nam-Sun Cho
  • Eun Young Song
  • Kyoung Un ParkEmail author
  • Junghan Song
  • Kyou Sup Han
Original Article

Abstract

It is often difficult for standard blood banks in Korea to supply adequate amounts of blood for patients with rare phenotype. Moreover, the definition of a blood in need is ambiguous, and much remains to be learned. In this study, we determined the prevalence of various red blood cell (RBC) antigens from a donor viewpoint and estimated the demand for specific antigen-negative blood from a patient viewpoint. Our data will aid the establishment of a Rare Blood Program in Korea (KRBP). RBC genotyping of 419 blood donors was performed using a Lifecodes RBC/RBC-R typing kit (Immucor, Norcross, GA). A national recipient registry website has been established. Each hospital-based blood bank voluntarily enters data on antibodies detected and identified and the outcomes of specific antigen testing. We calculated the availabilities of specific antigen-negative blood components based on these registry data and predicted the prevalence of RBC antigens via RBC genotyping. The prevalences of various RBC antigens in the D-negative population were determined for the first time, and the Cartwright, Scianna, Dombrock, Colton, Landsteiner-Wiener, Cromer, and Knops blood group systems were identified. The availabilities of specific antigen-negative units differed when calculations were based on serotyping or genotyping, especially in the D-negative group. Data on the prevalences of various blood antigens are essential for estimating the availabilities of blood components that are appropriate for use by patients expressing relevant antibodies. Then, blood banks would be able to efficiently supply safe blood products.

Keywords

RBC genotyping RhD negatives Luminex 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by research fund for “frequency investigation of rare blood groups in Koreans and management system development of associated blood components (2011E3400300 and 08-2012-010) and establishment and operation of the Korean Rare Blood Program (KRBP) for personalized transfusion (20121206077-00 and 20140506667-00)” from Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have disclosed no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

277_2016_2645_MOESM1_ESM.docx (29 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 28 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yun Ji Hong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yousun Chung
    • 2
  • Sang Mee Hwang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeong Su Park
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeong-Ran Kwon
    • 3
  • Young Sill Choi
    • 3
  • Jun Nyun Kim
    • 3
  • Dong Han Lee
    • 4
  • So-Yong Kwon
    • 5
  • Nam-Sun Cho
    • 6
  • Eun Young Song
    • 2
  • Kyoung Un Park
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Junghan Song
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kyou Sup Han
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Laboratory MedicineSeoul National University Bundang HospitalSeongnamKorea
  2. 2.Department of Laboratory MedicineSeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulKorea
  3. 3.Division of Human Blood Safety SurveillanceKorea Centers for Disease and PreventionCheongjuKorea
  4. 4.Division of Medical Science Knowledge ManagementKorea Centers for Disease Control and PreventionCheongjuKorea
  5. 5.Blood Transfusion Research InstituteKorean Red CrossWonjuKorea
  6. 6.Blood Service HeadquartersKorean Red CrossWonjuKorea

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