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Annals of Hematology

, Volume 92, Issue 9, pp 1291–1292 | Cite as

Daytime pulse oximetry measurements may not predict nocturnal desaturations in adult sickle cell patients

  • Hiren Mehta
  • Jimmy T. Efird
  • Renuka A. Kadali
  • Peter Boettger
  • Darla Liles
  • Charles Knupp
  • Sunil Sharma
Letter to the Editor
  • 149 Downloads

Dear Editor,

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive genetic blood disorder characterized by red blood cells that assume an abnormal, rigid, sickle shape [1]. In pediatric SCD, the frequency of transient 15–30-s duration episodes of hypoxia during sleep correlated with the frequency of painful sickle cell crisis [2]. Nocturnal desaturation has been described in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease, with a prevalence of up to 40 % in children and adolescents [3]. Whether nocturnal hypoxemia has similar prevalence and impact on an adult SCD population is not known.

Up to 40 % of adults with sickle cell disease have sudden death events without any detectable cause found at autopsy [4]. Nocturnal hypoxemia may contribute to these events and contribute to this reduced survival either acutely or chronically. Prior studies have revealed that pulse oximetry is a reliable tool in assessing patients with and without sickle cell disease [5, 10].

The charts of all patients with...

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sickle Cell Disease Pulse Oximetry Sickle Cell Disease Patient Nocturnal Hypoxemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

None of the authors have declared any conflict of interest pertaining to the work submitted.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiren Mehta
    • 1
  • Jimmy T. Efird
    • 1
  • Renuka A. Kadali
    • 1
  • Peter Boettger
    • 1
  • Darla Liles
    • 1
  • Charles Knupp
    • 1
  • Sunil Sharma
    • 2
  1. 1.Brody School of MedicineEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pulmonary/Critical Care and Jefferson Sleep Disorders CenterPhiladelphiaUSA

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