Annals of Hematology

, Volume 91, Issue 12, pp 1923–1928 | Cite as

Excellent long-term survival of 170 patients with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia treated in private oncology practices and a university hospital

  • M. Hensel
  • J. Brust
  • C. Plöger
  • D. Schuster
  • M. L. Memmer
  • J. Franz-Werner
  • H.-P. Feustel
  • A. Karcher
  • S. Fuxius
  • F. A. Mosthaf
  • M. Rieger
  • A. D. Ho
  • M. Witzens-Harig
Original Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare treatment and outcome of patients with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) in four private oncology practices (PP) and a university hospital (UH) in southwest Germany. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients with WM of the last two decades of four PP in Mannheim, Heidelberg, Karlsruhe, and Speyer and the Department of Hematology of the University of Heidelberg. One hundred seventy patients could be identified, 74 from PP, 96 from the UH. Median age was 63.3 years. Patients from PP were older (median 65.3 vs. 62.5 years, p = 0.01). Only 54 % of patients from PP have received treatment during the observation time, as compared to 78.1 % of the UH (p < 0.001). In PP, 35 % of treated patients have received rituximab, as compared to 62.6 % of the patients of the UH (p < 0.001). Sixty percent of treated patients of PP have received bendamustine, as compared to only 8 % of the patients of the UH (p < 0.001). Time to first treatment was significantly shorter in patients from the UH compared to PP (median 13.7 vs. 52.9 months, p = 0.05). A trend towards a better overall survival was observed for patients treated with a rituximab-containing first-line regimen. The International Prognostic Scoring System for WM had significant prognostic value. Median overall survival was 25.0 years and did not differ between PP and UH. Despite different treatment strategies between PP and UH today overall survival of patients with WM is excellent, and better than previously reported.

Keywords

Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia Long-term survival Treatment Private practice University hospital 

Notes

Disclaimers

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Hensel
    • 1
  • J. Brust
    • 1
  • C. Plöger
    • 1
  • D. Schuster
    • 1
  • M. L. Memmer
    • 2
  • J. Franz-Werner
    • 4
  • H.-P. Feustel
    • 4
  • A. Karcher
    • 5
  • S. Fuxius
    • 5
  • F. A. Mosthaf
    • 3
  • M. Rieger
    • 2
  • A. D. Ho
    • 2
  • M. Witzens-Harig
    • 2
  1. 1.Mannheimer Onkologie PraxisMannheimGermany
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine V (Hematology and Oncology)University of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Onkologische Schwerpunktpraxis KarlsruheKarlsruheGermany
  4. 4.Onkologische Schwerpunktpraxis SpeyerSpeyerGermany
  5. 5.Onkologische Schwerpunktpraxis HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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