Advertisement

Annals of Hematology

, Volume 91, Issue 5, pp 789–791 | Cite as

Quantification of plasma Epstein–Barr virus DNA for assessing treatment response in a patient with plasmablastic lymphoma

  • Man Fai Law
  • Wai Lun Poon
  • Kwan Shun Ng
  • Hay Nun Chan
  • Ho Kei Lai
  • Chun Yin Ha
  • Celia Ng
  • Yiu Ming Yeung
  • Sze Fai Yip
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare and aggressive type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It typically expresses plasma cell-associated markers, but with weak or absent expression of pan B cell markers (CD19, CD20). Ninety percent of the patients are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive, and most patients have advanced diseases [1]. The pathogenesis is Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) related in most patients [2, 3]. Treatment of PBL has consisted of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP); hyper-CVAD chemotherapy [4]; or local excision followed by radiation. The clinical course is usually aggressive, and most of the patients die in the first year after diagnosis [5].

In other EBV-associated lymphomas such as Hodgkin's lymphoma and nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, circulating EBV DNA has been reported to be a useful biomarker for monitoring response to chemotherapy treatment [6, 7, 8]. The use of circulating EBV DNA in PBL was not studied. In this report,...

Keywords

Rheumatic Heart Disease Latent Membrane Protein Chop Chemotherapy Plasmablastic Lymphoma Tuberculosis Lymphadenitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors would like to thank Dr WY Au for the assay of the plasma EBV DNA.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Sarode SC, Sarode GS, Patil A (2010) Plasmablastic lymphoma of oral cavity: a review. Oral Oncol 46:146–53PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Borenstein J, Pezzella F, Gatter KC (2007) Plasmablastic lymphoma may occur as post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders. Histopathology 51:774–777PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dong HY, Scadden DT, de Leval L et al (2005) Plasmablastic lymphoma in HIV positive patients: an aggressive Epstein–Barr virus associated extramedullary plasmacytic neoplasm. Am J Surg Pathol 29:1633–1641PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Nguyen DD, Loo BW, Tillman G et al (2003) Plasmablastic lymphoma presenting in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: a case report. Ann Hematol 82:521–525PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Colomo L, Loong F, Rives S et al (2004) Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with plasmablastic differentiation represent a heterogenous group of disease entities. Am J Surg Pathol 28:736–747PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Au WY, Pang A, Choy C et al (2004) Quantification of circulating Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) DNA in the diagnosis and monitoring of natural killer cell and EBV-positive lymphomas in immunocompetent patients. Blood 104(1):243–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Gandhi MK, Lambley E, Burrows J et al (2006) Plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) DNA is a biomarker for EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma. Clin Cancer Res 12(2):460–4PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Spacek M, Hubacek P, Markova J et al (2010) Can we use EBV-DNA monitoring to predict disease relapse in EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma patients? Acta Haematol 124(1):23–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Wagner HJ, Fischer L, Jabs WJ et al (2002) Longitudinal analysis of Epstein–Barr viral load in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of transplanted patients by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Transplantation 74:656–64PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Berger C, Day P, Meier G et al (2001) Dynamics of Epstein–Barr virus DNA levels in serum during EBV associated disease. J Med Virol 64:505–12PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Man Fai Law
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wai Lun Poon
    • 3
  • Kwan Shun Ng
    • 4
  • Hay Nun Chan
    • 1
  • Ho Kei Lai
    • 1
  • Chun Yin Ha
    • 1
  • Celia Ng
    • 1
  • Yiu Ming Yeung
    • 1
  • Sze Fai Yip
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineTuen Mun HospitalHong KongChina
  2. 2.Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales HospitalThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyTuen Mun HospitalHong KongChina
  4. 4.Department of PathologyTuen Mun HospitalHong KongChina

Personalised recommendations