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Annals of Hematology

, Volume 90, Issue 12, pp 1419–1426 | Cite as

Successful cross-presentation of allogeneic myeloma cells by autologous alpha-type 1-polarized dendritic cells as an effective tumor antigen in myeloma patients with matched monoclonal immunoglobulins

  • Deok-Hwan Yang
  • Mi-Hyun Kim
  • Youn-Kyung Lee
  • Cheol Yi Hong
  • Hyun Ju Lee
  • Thanh-Nhan Nguyen-Pham
  • Soo Young Bae
  • Jae-Sook Ahn
  • Yeo-Kyeoung Kim
  • Ik-Joo Chung
  • Hyeoung-Joon Kim
  • Pawel Kalinski
  • Je-Jung LeeEmail author
Original Article

Abstracts

For wide application of a dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in myeloma patients, easily available tumor antigens should be developed. We investigated the feasibility of cellular immunotherapy using autologous alpha-type 1-polarized dendritic cells (αDC1s) loaded with apoptotic allogeneic myeloma cells, which could generate myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) against autologous myeloma cells in myeloma patients. Monocyte-derived DCs were matured by adding the αDC1-polarizing cocktail (TNFα/IL-1β/IFN-α/IFN-γ/poly-I:C) and loaded with apoptotic allogeneic CD138+ myeloma cells from other patients with matched monoclonal immunoglobulins as a tumor antigen. There were no differences in the phenotypic expression between αDC1s loaded with apoptotic autologous and allogeneic myeloma cells. Autologous αDC1s effectively took up apoptotic allogeneic myeloma cells from other patients with matched subtype. Myeloma-specific CTLs against autologous target cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with allogeneic tumor antigen. The cross-presentation of apoptotic allogeneic myeloma cells to αDC1s could generate CTL responses between myeloma patients with individual matched monoclonal immunoglobulins. There was no difference in CTL responses between αDC1s loaded with autologous tumor antigen and allogeneic tumor antigen against targeting patient's myeloma cells. Our data indicate that autologous DCs loaded with allogeneic myeloma cells with matched immunoglobulin can generate potent myeloma-specific CTL responses against autologous myeloma cells and can be a highly feasible and effective method for cellular immunotherapy in myeloma patients.

Keywords

Myeloma Dendritic cells Allogeneic myeloma cells Immunotherapy Cytotoxic T lymphocytes 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deok-Hwan Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mi-Hyun Kim
    • 2
    • 3
  • Youn-Kyung Lee
    • 2
    • 3
  • Cheol Yi Hong
    • 2
  • Hyun Ju Lee
    • 2
  • Thanh-Nhan Nguyen-Pham
    • 2
  • Soo Young Bae
    • 1
  • Jae-Sook Ahn
    • 1
  • Yeo-Kyeoung Kim
    • 1
  • Ik-Joo Chung
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Hyeoung-Joon Kim
    • 1
  • Pawel Kalinski
    • 5
  • Je-Jung Lee
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Hematology-OncologyChonnam National University Hwasun HospitalHwasunSouth Korea
  2. 2.Research Center for Cancer ImmunotherapyChonnam National University Hwasun HospitalHwasunSouth Korea
  3. 3.Vaxcell-Bio TherapeuticsHwasunSouth Korea
  4. 4.The Brain Korea 21 Project, Center for Biomedical Human ResourcesChonnam National UniversityGwangjuSouth Korea
  5. 5.Department of SurgeryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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