Annals of Hematology

, Volume 88, Issue 10, pp 1005–1013

Outcome of HLA-matched related allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute leukemia in first complete remission treated in Eastern European centers. Better results in recent years

  • Sebastian Giebel
  • Myriam Labopin
  • Jerzy Holowiecki
  • Boris Labar
  • Mieczyslaw Komarnicki
  • Vladimir Koza
  • Tamas Masszi
  • Martin Mistrik
  • Andrzej Lange
  • Andrzej Hellmann
  • Antonin Vitek
  • Joze Pretnar
  • Jiri Mayer
  • Piotr Rzepecki
  • Karel Indrak
  • Wieslaw Wiktor-Jedrzejczak
  • Jerzy Wojnar
  • Malgorzata Krawczyk-Kulis
  • Slawomira Kyrcz-Krzemien
  • Vanderson Rocha
Original Article

Abstract

The goal of this study was to analyze results and to determine factors affecting outcome of HLA-matched hematopoetic stem cells transplantation (MRD-HSCT) for patients with acute leukemia transplanted in first complete remission in Eastern European countries. Six hundred forty HSCT were performed between 1990 and 2006 for adults with acute myeloid (n = 459) and lymphoblastic (n = 181) leukemia. Two-year leukemia-free survival (LFS), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), and relapse incidence were 58 ± 2%, 19 ± 2%, and 23 ± 2%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of NRM decreased from 22 ± 2% for patients treated between 1990 and 2002 to 15 ± 3% for transplantations performed between 2003 and 2006 (p = 0.02), despite increasing recipient age. In a multivariate analysis, time of HSCT affected both NRM and LFS. Among other prognostic factors, the use of TBI decreased relapse incidence and increased the LFS rate. We conclude that results of MRD-HSCT for acute leukemia in Eastern Europe improved over time as a consequence of decreased NRM. The use of TBI containing regimens appears advantagous.

Key words

Matched related donor HSCT Acute leukemia Prognostic factors Leukemia-free survival Nonrelapse mortality 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sebastian Giebel
    • 1
  • Myriam Labopin
    • 2
  • Jerzy Holowiecki
    • 1
  • Boris Labar
    • 3
  • Mieczyslaw Komarnicki
    • 4
  • Vladimir Koza
    • 5
  • Tamas Masszi
    • 6
  • Martin Mistrik
    • 7
  • Andrzej Lange
    • 8
  • Andrzej Hellmann
    • 9
  • Antonin Vitek
    • 10
  • Joze Pretnar
    • 11
  • Jiri Mayer
    • 12
  • Piotr Rzepecki
    • 13
  • Karel Indrak
    • 14
  • Wieslaw Wiktor-Jedrzejczak
    • 15
  • Jerzy Wojnar
    • 16
  • Malgorzata Krawczyk-Kulis
    • 16
  • Slawomira Kyrcz-Krzemien
    • 16
  • Vanderson Rocha
    • 17
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer CenterMaria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute Branch GliwiceGliwicePoland
  2. 2.European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Acute Leukemia Working Party, Hopital Saint-AntoineAssistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris and Université de Paris 6ParisFrance
  3. 3.Department of HematologyUniversity Hospital Center RebroZagrebCroatia
  4. 4.Department of HematologyUniversity of Medical SciencesPoznanPoland
  5. 5.Department of Hematology and OncologyCharles University Hospital PilsenPilsenCzech Republic
  6. 6.Department of Bone Marrow TransplantationSzent László HospitalBudapestHungary
  7. 7.Clinic of Hematology and Transfusion MedicineUniversity of BrastislavaBratislavaSlovakia
  8. 8.Lower Silesian Center for Cellular Transplantation with National Bone Marrow Donor RegistryWroclawPoland
  9. 9.Department of HematologyMedical University of GdanskGdanskPoland
  10. 10.Institute of Hematology and Blood TransfusionPragueCzech Republic
  11. 11.Department of HematologyUniversity Medical Center LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  12. 12.Department of Internal Medicine, Hemato-OncologyUniversity Hospital BrnoBrnoCzech Republic
  13. 13.Bone Marrow Transplantation UnitMilitary Medical AcademyWarsawPoland
  14. 14.Department of Hemato-OncologyUniversity Hospital OlomoucOlomoucCzech Republic
  15. 15.Department of Hematology and OncologyMedical University of WarsawWarsawPoland
  16. 16.Department of Hematology and Bone Marrow TransplantationSilesian Medical UniversityKatowicePoland
  17. 17.Department of HematologyHopital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de ParisParisFrance

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