Annals of Hematology

, Volume 84, Issue 11, pp 697–708 | Cite as

Colony-stimulating factors in the management of neutropenia and its complications

Review Article

Abstract

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and granulocyte–macrophage CSF are potent drugs used to increase neutrophil counts after myelosuppressive chemotherapy. However, in various indications, the use of CSFs has no clinical benefit with regard to morbidity or mortality from infectious complications, frequency of antibiotic use, or rate of hospitalization. Thus, the application of CSFs should be limited to indications with proven clinical benefits or evidence of cost-effectiveness. This review will provide an overview of the state-of-the-art use of CSFs in chemotherapy-associated neutropenia, transplantation, and bone marrow failure syndromes. In addition, recently developed drugs for accelerated hematopoietic recovery will be presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Hematology, Hemostaseology, and OncologyHannover Medical SchoolHannoverGermany

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