Annals of Hematology

, Volume 85, Issue 7, pp 434–442

Distinct effects of different concentrations of sodium selenite on apoptosis, cell cycle, and gene expression profile in acute promyeloytic leukemia-derived NB4 cells

  • Ting-Ming Cao
  • Fang-Yuan Hua
  • Cai-Min Xu
  • Bing-She Han
  • Hua Dong
  • Lu Zuo
  • Xuan Wang
  • Yang Yang
  • Hua-Zhen Pan
  • Zhi-Nan Zhang
Original Article

Abstract

Selenium at a low concentration has a chemopreventive role against cancer, while at a high concentration, it exerts a direct antitumor effect. However, the mechanisms remain elusive. In this article, we discovered that Na2SeO3 at 20 μmol/l concentration could significantly inhibit the proliferation of NB4 cells, affect the cell cycle distribution of cell population, and induce cellular changes characteristic of apoptotic cells, while this same compound at 2 μmol/l concentration had no such effects. The mechanisms underlying these overt differences caused by treatment of different concentrations of selenium were further investigated. cDNA microarray analysis showed that after treatment by 20 μmol/l Na2SeO3, 34 genes were changed in expression, while treatment by 2 μmol/l Na2SeO3 resulted in the changes of 29 genes. Nine genes were regulated in both groups, among which three showed opposite changes caused by 2 and 20 μmol/l Na2SeO3. The majority of regulated genes did not coincide between the two experiment groups. In conclusion, 2 and 20 μmol/l Na2SeO3 could have different effects on NB4 cells, and some genes might be involved in the underlying mechanisms. Our findings could provide basis for further uncovering the molecular mechanisms of the chemopreventive and antitumor effects of selenium and, in turn, for probing the rationality of treating leukemia with selenium.

Keywords

Sodium selenite Acute promyelocytic leukemia Apoptosis cDNA microarray 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ting-Ming Cao
    • 1
  • Fang-Yuan Hua
    • 1
  • Cai-Min Xu
    • 1
  • Bing-She Han
    • 1
  • Hua Dong
    • 1
  • Lu Zuo
    • 2
  • Xuan Wang
    • 2
  • Yang Yang
    • 1
  • Hua-Zhen Pan
    • 1
  • Zhi-Nan Zhang
    • 2
  1. 1.National Laboratory of Medical Molecular BiologyInstitute of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingPeople's Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of HematologyPeking Union Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingPeople's Republic of China

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