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Annals of Hematology

, Volume 83, Issue 11, pp 726–727 | Cite as

Anagrelide therapy in pregnancy: report of a case of essential thrombocythemia

  • Michael Doubek
  • Yvona Brychtova
  • Radan Doubek
  • Petr Janku
  • Jiri Mayer
Letter to the Editor

Platelet-lowering agents currently often used in essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients with a high risk of developing thrombohemorrhagic complications include hydroxyurea, interferon-alpha, and anagrelide [1]. Anagrelide is a very effective drug for controlling peripheral blood platelet counts and symptoms in most patients with thrombocythemia [2]. However, anagrelide therapy is not recommended for women who are pregnant [3, 4]. Nevertheless, there is no clear evidence of anagrelide having an adverse influence on pregnancy in humans.

This report describes our experience with anagrelide administration during pregnancy. A 26-year-old woman was diagnosed with ET in July 2000. The first manifestation of ET in this woman was severe thrombosis of the cerebral venous sinuses. Thrombocytosis (948×109/l) was not the single risk factor for thrombosis. Hereditary thrombophilia was also diagnosed. Our patient is a heterozygous carrier of the factor V Leiden mutation.

Treatment of ET with...

Keywords

Thrombophilia Essential Thrombocythemia Anagrelide Factor Versus Leiden Mutation Thrombocyte Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Doubek
    • 1
  • Yvona Brychtova
    • 1
  • Radan Doubek
    • 2
  • Petr Janku
    • 2
  • Jiri Mayer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine—Haematology/OncologyUniversity Hospital BrnoBrnoCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Gynaecology and ObstetricsUniversity Hospital BrnoBrnoCzech Republic

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