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Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy

, Volume 41, Issue 9, pp 1079–1081 | Cite as

Ultrasonic identification of internal jugular vein fenestration

  • Mehmet Akif AbakayEmail author
  • Baver Maşallah Şimşek
  • Burak Olgun
  • Rüştü Türkay
  • Selçuk Güneş
Anatomic Variations
  • 32 Downloads

Abstract

Objective

Anatomic variations have curicial importance during neck surgery. We present a fenestrated internal jugular vein variation and the accessory nerve passing through it. Also, we discuss preoperative diagnosis of this variation using ultrasonography.

Method

The possible recognition of this variation by ultrasonography is introduced.

Results

The accessory nerve in an internal jugular vein fenestration can be seen using ultrasonography.

Conclusion

Preoperative identification of this rare variation may secure surgeon from potential complications.

Keywords

Neck dissection Ultrasound Jugular vein Complication Variation 

Notes

Author contributions

MAA: Protocol/project development, Data collection, Data analysis, Manuscript writing, BMŞ: Protocol/project development, Data collection, Data analysis, BO: Data collection, Data analysis, Manuscript writing, RT: Protocol/project development, Data collection, Data analysis, GS: Protocol/project development, Data collection, Data analysis, Manuscript writing.

Funding

None.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflict of interests to declare.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck SurgeryBakırköy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research HospitalIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyBakırköy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research HospitalIstanbulTurkey

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