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Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 25–28 | Cite as

Morphological characteristics of the lateral talocalcaneal ligament: a large-scale anatomical study

  • Mutsuaki EdamaEmail author
  • Ikuo Kageyama
  • Takaniri Kikumoto
  • Tomoya Takabayashi
  • Takuma Inai
  • Ryo Hirabayashi
  • Wataru Ito
  • Emi Nakamura
  • Masahiro Ikezu
  • Fumiya Kaneko
  • Akira Kumazaki
  • Hiromi Inaba
  • Go Omori
Anatomic Variations
  • 65 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to clarify the morphological characteristics of the lateral talocalcaneal ligament (LTCL).

Methods

This study examined 100 legs from 54 Japanese cadavers. The LTCL was classified into three types: Type I, the LTCL branches from the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); Type II, the LTCL is independent of the CFL and runs parallel to the calcaneus; and Type III, the LTCL is absent. The morphological features measured were fiber bundle length, fiber bundle width, and fiber bundle thickness.

Results

The LTCL was classified as Type I in 18 feet (18%), Type II in 24 feet (24%), and Type III in 58 feet (58%). All LTCLs were associated with the anterior talofibular ligament at the talus. There was no significant difference in morphological characteristics by Type for each ligament.

Conclusions

The LTCL was similar to the CFL in terms of fiber bundle width and fiber bundle thickness.

Keywords

Calcaneofibular Ligament Subtalar joint Gross anatomy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by a Research Activity Young B Grant (20632326) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and a Grant-in-Aid from Niigata University of Health and Welfare (H30B05).

Author contributions

ME, IK, and TK contributed to study design and data collection and drafted the manuscript; TT, WI, EN, RH, and TI contributed to data analysis and made critical revisions to the manuscript; MI, FK, AK, and HI made critical revisions to the manuscript; GO supervised the study, contributed to analysis and interpretation of data, and made critical revisions to the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript prior to submission.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The methods were carried out in accordance with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and the cadavers were legally donated for the research by the Nippon Dental University of Life Dentistry at Niigata in Japan.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from the families of all subjects.

Availability of data and material

The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mutsuaki Edama
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ikuo Kageyama
    • 2
  • Takaniri Kikumoto
    • 1
  • Tomoya Takabayashi
    • 1
  • Takuma Inai
    • 1
  • Ryo Hirabayashi
    • 1
  • Wataru Ito
    • 1
  • Emi Nakamura
    • 1
  • Masahiro Ikezu
    • 1
  • Fumiya Kaneko
    • 1
  • Akira Kumazaki
    • 3
  • Hiromi Inaba
    • 4
  • Go Omori
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Human Movement and Medical SciencesNiigata University of Health and WelfareNiigataJapan
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy, School of Life Dentistry at NiigataNippon Dental UniversityNiigataJapan
  3. 3.Department of Health and SportsNiigata University of Health and WelfareNiigataJapan
  4. 4.Department of Health and NutritionNiigata University of Health and WelfareNiigataJapan

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