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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 227–232 | Cite as

Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

  • Takeshi Kamitani
  • Satoshi Kawanami
  • Yoshiki Asayama
  • Yoshio Matsuo
  • Masato Yonezawa
  • Yuzo Yamasaki
  • Michinobu Nagao
  • Torahiko Yamanouchi
  • Hidetake Yabuuchi
  • Katsumasa Nakamura
  • Torahiko Nakashima
  • Hiroshi Honda
Clinical Investigation

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer.

Materials and Methods

We retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings.

Results

The main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01).

Conclusion

A careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

Keywords

Clinical practice  Interventional oncology  Arterial intervention  Intraarterial Cancer 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Satoshi Kawanami and Michinobu Nagao received research grants from Bayer AG and Koninklijke Philips Electronics NV.

Ethical standards

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

This retrospective study was approved by the Ethical Review Board on Clinical Study at our institution. The requirement of informed consent was waived.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Kamitani
    • 1
  • Satoshi Kawanami
    • 2
  • Yoshiki Asayama
    • 1
  • Yoshio Matsuo
    • 1
  • Masato Yonezawa
    • 1
  • Yuzo Yamasaki
    • 1
  • Michinobu Nagao
    • 2
  • Torahiko Yamanouchi
    • 1
  • Hidetake Yabuuchi
    • 3
  • Katsumasa Nakamura
    • 1
  • Torahiko Nakashima
    • 4
  • Hiroshi Honda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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