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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 494–497 | Cite as

Endovascular Repair of a Complex Splenic Artery Aneurysm Using a Multilayer Stent

  • Matthias Müller-Eschner
  • Nikolas Kortes
  • Christoph Rehnitz
  • Migle Sumkauskaite
  • Fabian Rengier
  • Dittmar Böckler
  • Hans-Ulrich Kauczor
  • Boris RadeleffEmail author
Letter to the Editor

To the Editor,

Based on autopsy studies, the prevalence of visceral artery aneurysms has been estimated to be up to 10 % [1], with up to 25 % complicated by rupture and a mortality rate of up to 70 % [2]. Splenic artery aneurysms (SAA) account for ~60 % of visceral artery aneurysms [2]. Asymptomatic SAA larger than 2 cm should be treated either by operation or endovascular techniques [3, 4]. In recent years, exclusion of aneurysms by implanting multilayer stents is considered an attractive, minimally invasive treatment option [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. Due to the multilayer design of this vascular prosthesis, the tubular, self-expanding multilayer stent (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) is supposed to decrease velocity and vorticity of intra-aneurysmal blood flow. Thereby, thrombus formation within the aneurysm sac shall be deemed over time. The affected main artery and moreover branching vessels deriving from the aneurysm or the proximal and distal landing zones are expected to remain patent due to...

Keywords

Splenic Artery Endovascular Repair Splenic Infarction Amplatzer Vascular Plug Splenic Artery Aneurysm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Matthias Müller-Eschner received a grant from the German Research Foundation (DFG) within project R03, SFB/TRR 125 “Cognition-Guided Surgery”.

Conflict of interest

The authors Matthias Müller-Eschner, Nikolas Kortes, Christoph Rehnitz, Migle Sumkauskaite, Fabian Rengier, Dittmar Böckler, Hans-Ulrich Kauczor, and Boris Radeleff declare no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthias Müller-Eschner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nikolas Kortes
    • 1
  • Christoph Rehnitz
    • 1
  • Migle Sumkauskaite
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fabian Rengier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dittmar Böckler
    • 3
  • Hans-Ulrich Kauczor
    • 1
  • Boris Radeleff
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Diagnostic and Interventional RadiologyUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of Radiology E010German Cancer Research Center (dkfz) HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Department of Vascular and Endovascular SurgeryUniversity Hospital HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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