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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 269–271 | Cite as

Aberrant Ovarian Collateral Originating from External Iliac Artery During Uterine Artery Embolization

  • Joon Ho Kwon
  • Man Deuk KimEmail author
  • Kwang-hun Lee
  • Myungsu Lee
  • Mu Sook Lee
  • Jong Yun Won
  • Sung Il Park
  • Do Yun Lee
Case Report

Abstract

We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic multiple uterine fibroids with collateral aberrant right ovarian artery that originated from the right external iliac artery. We believe that this is the first reported case in the literature of this collateral uterine flow by the right ovarian artery originated from the right external iliac artery. We briefly present the details of the case and review the literature on variations of ovarian artery origin that might be encountered during UAE.

Keywords

Uterine artery embolization Leiomyoma Uterus Aberrant ovarian artery Ovarian artery embolization 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflict of interest to report.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Ho Kwon
    • 1
  • Man Deuk Kim
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kwang-hun Lee
    • 1
  • Myungsu Lee
    • 1
  • Mu Sook Lee
    • 1
  • Jong Yun Won
    • 1
  • Sung Il Park
    • 1
  • Do Yun Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance HospitalYonsei University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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