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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 187–190 | Cite as

Recanalization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm After Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Using N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

  • Keiji Matsumoto
  • Yasuhiro UshijimaEmail author
  • Tsuyoshi Tajima
  • Akihiro Nishie
  • Masakazu Hirakawa
  • Kousei Ishigami
  • Yukiko Yamaji
  • Hiroshi Honda
Case Report

Abstract

A 65-year-old woman who had been diagnosed as having microscopic polyangiitis developed sudden abdominal pain and entered a state of shock. Abdominal CT showed massive hemoperitoneum, and emergent angiography revealed a ruptured splenic artery aneurysm. After direct catheterization attempts failed due to tortuous vessels and angiospasm, transcatheter arterial embolization using an n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-lipiodol mixture was successfully performed. Fifty days later, the patient developed sudden abdominal pain again. Repeated angiography demonstrated recanalization of the splenic artery and splenic artery aneurysm. This time, the recanalized aneurysm was embolized using metallic coils with the isolation method. Physicians should keep in mind that recanalization can occur after transcatheter arterial embolization using N-butyl cyanoacrylate, which has been used as a permanent embolic agent.

Keywords

N-Butyl cyanoacrylate Embolization Recanalization Splenic artery Aneurysm 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keiji Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Yasuhiro Ushijima
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tsuyoshi Tajima
    • 1
  • Akihiro Nishie
    • 1
  • Masakazu Hirakawa
    • 1
  • Kousei Ishigami
    • 1
  • Yukiko Yamaji
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Honda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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