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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 106–113 | Cite as

Angiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Grafting with Prefabricated Small-Diameter, Small-Intestinal Submucosa Grafts in Sheep

  • Dusan PavcnikEmail author
  • Josef Obermiller
  • Barry T. Uchida
  • William Van Alstine
  • James M. Edwards
  • Gregory J. Landry
  • John A. Kaufman
  • Frederick S. Keller
  • Josef Rösch
Laboratory Investigation

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to report the longitudinal angiographic evaluation of prefabricated lyophilized small-intestinal submucosa (SIS) grafts placed in ovine carotid arteries and to demonstrate a variety of complications that developed. A total of 24 grafts, 10 cm long and 6 mm in diameter, were placed surgically as interposition grafts. Graft patency at 1 week was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, and angiography was used for follow-up at 1 month and at 3 to 4 months. A 90% patency rate was found at 1 week, 65% at 1 month, and 30% at 3 to 4 months. On the patent grafts, angiography demonstrated a variety of changes, such as anastomotic stenoses, graft diffuse dilations and dissections, and aneurysm formation. These findings have not been previously demonstrated angiographically by other investigators reporting results with small-diameter vessel grafts made from fresh small-intestinal submucosa (SIS). The complications found were partially related to the graft construction from four SIS layers. Detailed longitudinal angiographic study should become an essential part of any future evaluation of small-vessel SIS grafting.

Keywords

Bioprosthetic graft Aneurysm Arteriography Small-intestinal submucosa 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This study was supported in part by a grant from Cook Biotech.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dusan Pavcnik
    • 1
    Email author
  • Josef Obermiller
    • 2
  • Barry T. Uchida
    • 1
  • William Van Alstine
    • 3
  • James M. Edwards
    • 4
  • Gregory J. Landry
    • 1
    • 4
  • John A. Kaufman
    • 1
  • Frederick S. Keller
    • 1
  • Josef Rösch
    • 1
  1. 1.Dotter Interventional InstituteOregon Health Sciences University, L342PortlandUSA
  2. 2.Cook BiotechWest LafayetteUSA
  3. 3.Animal Disease Diagnostic LaboratoryPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  4. 4.Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of SurgeryOregon Health & Science UniversityPortlandUSA

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