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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 137–139 | Cite as

Incidence of Important Hemobilia Following Transhepatic Biliary Drainage: Left-Sided Versus Right-Sided Approaches

  • G. M. Rivera-Sanfeliz
  • O. S. A. Assar
  • J. M. LaBerge
  • M. W. Wilson
  • R. L. Gordon
  • E. J. Ring
  • R. K. Kerlan Jr.
Article

Abstract

Our purpose here is to describe our experience with important hemobilia following PTBD and to determine whether left-sided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is associated with an increased incidence of important hemobilia compared to right-sided drainages. We reviewed 346 transhepatic biliary drainages over a four-year period and identified eight patients (2.3%) with important hemobilia requiring transcatheter embolization. The charts and radiographic files of these patients were reviewed. The side of the PTBD (left versus right), and the order of the biliary ductal branch entered (first, second, or third) were recorded. Of the 346 PTBDs, 269 were right-sided and 77 were left-sided. Of the eight cases of important hemobilia requiring transcatheter embolization, four followed right-sided and four followed left-sided PTBD, corresponding to a bleeding incidence of 1.5% (4/269) for right PTBD and 5.2% (4/77) for left PTBD. The higher incidence of hemobilia associated with left-sided PTBD approached, but did not reach the threshold of statistical significance (p = 0.077). In six of the eight patients requiring transcatheter embolization, first or second order biliary branches were accessed by catheter for PTBD. All patients with left-sided bleeding had first or proximal second order branches accessed by biliary drainage catheters. In conclusion, a higher incidence of hemobilia followed left- versus right-sided PTBD in this study, but the increased incidence did not reach statistical significance.

Keywords

Bile ducts—Hemorrhage—Interventional procedures—Hepatic artery—Therapeutic blockade—Interventional procedures and complications 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. M. Rivera-Sanfeliz
    • 1
    • 2
  • O. S. A. Assar
    • 1
  • J. M. LaBerge
    • 1
  • M. W. Wilson
    • 1
  • R. L. Gordon
    • 1
  • E. J. Ring
    • 1
  • R. K. Kerlan Jr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyUCSF Medical Center, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628USA
  2. 2.Current address: Department of Radiology, UCSD Medical Center, 200 West Arbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92103-8756USA

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