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CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 180–185 | Cite as

Transcatheter Microcoil Embolotherapy for Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm Following Pancreatic and Biliary Surgery

  • Toshiya Shibata
  • Tadashi Sagoh
  • Fumie Ametani
  • Yoji Maetani
  • Kyo Itoh
  • Junji Konishi

Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of transcatheter microcoil embolotherapy for bleeding pseudoaneurysms complicating major pancreatic and biliary surgery. Materials and Methods: Over an 8-year period, 8 patients were encountered who developed massive bleeding from pseudoaneurysms 15–64 days (mean 31 days) following major pancreatic and biliary surgery. Urgent transcatheter microcoil embolotherapy was performed in all 8 patients. Results: Transcatheter embolotherapy was successful in 7 of 8 patients (88%) but failed in one due to development of disseminated intravascular coagulation. One patient developed recurrent bleeding 36 days after the first embolotherapy from a newly developed pseudoaneurysm, which was again treated successfully with embolization. Two patients subsequently underwent additional surgery for residual pathology. Three of the 7 patients with successful embolotherapy were alive at 10–96 months, 4 patients died of associated malignancies 4–20 months after embolotherapy. Conclusion: Transcatheter microcoil embolotherapy is effective for bleeding pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatic and biliary surgery, and should be considered the first treatment of choice.

Keywords

Disseminate Intravascular Coagulation Massive Bleeding Recurrent Bleeding Bleeding Pseudoaneurysms Transcatheter Embolotherapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiya Shibata
    • 1
  • Tadashi Sagoh
    • 1
  • Fumie Ametani
    • 1
  • Yoji Maetani
    • 1
  • Kyo Itoh
    • 1
  • Junji Konishi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto, 606-8507, JapanJAPAN

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