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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 1243–1248 | Cite as

Does Primary Hyperparathyroidism Have an Association with Thyroid Papillary Cancer? A Retrospective Cohort Study

  • Kenan ÇetinEmail author
  • Hasan E. Sıkar
  • Şule Temizkan
  • Cem B. Ofluoğlu
  • Ayşenur Özderya
  • Kadriye Aydın
  • Aylin E. Gül
  • Hasan F. Küçük
Original Scientific Report

Abstract

Background

To investigate the relationship between primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC).

Methods

The perioperative findings of 275 patients with pHPT who underwent surgery between January 2014 and December 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed with pHPT and PTC concurrently. Pathology results and demographic findings of these patients were compared with 186 patients who underwent thyroidectomy and diagnosed with PTC at the same time interval.

Results

The co-occurrence of pHPT and PTC was 11.3% (31/275). The median ages of the pHPT, pHPT + PTC, and PTC groups were 55, 57, and 50 years old, respectively (p < 0.001). The diameter of tumor was smaller in the pHPT + PTC group [median 7 mm (range 0.5–25 mm) vs. 15 mm (range 1–100 mm)], with higher rates of microcarcinomas (p < 0.001), than the patients in the PTC group. Examination of tumor morphology showed higher rates of tumor capsule invasion and multicentricity in the pHPT + PTC group than those in the isolated PTC group (p = 0.02, p = 0.04, respectively).

Conclusion

The pHPT + PTC group had significantly smaller tumor diameter than the PTC group. This result may support the idea that pHPT leads to overdiagnosis of PTC. However, observation of high rates of tumor capsule invasion and multicentricity in the pHPT + PTC group may suggest an associative etiology with more aggressive PTC.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None of the authors have any financial or other relationship leading to a conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participant were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Study protocol was approved by Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Research and Training Hospital in affiliation with University of Medical Sciences’ ethics committee.

Informed consent

Informed consent was not obtained from participants due to retrospective design of the study.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General SurgeryUniversity of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research HospitalIstanbulTurkey
  2. 2.Department of Endocrinology, Faculty of MedicineYeditepe UniversityIstanbulTurkey
  3. 3.Department of EndocrinologyUniversity of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research HospitalIstanbulTurkey
  4. 4.Department of PathologyUniversity of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research HospitalIstanbulTurkey

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