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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 42, Issue 9, pp 3062–3063 | Cite as

Surgical Management of Ranula Revisited

  • R. P. Morton
Invited Commentary
  • 101 Downloads

A ranula may present in two forms: a simple (or intraoral) ranula and a plunging (or cervical) ranula. A recent paper on ranula published in this journal [1] refers to “conflicting evidence as to which treatment modality is best”. Subsequent correspondence [2, 3] has exposed a need for a review of the alleged “gap in knowledge on the current concept of its aetiopathogenesis” [1].

Aetiology/pathogenesis

Ranulas are formed by some kind of trauma to the sublingual salivary gland (SLG) that leads to the extravasation of its secretions into the sublingual space and/or the deep cervical space. The ranula cyst itself is therefore a pseudocyst with contents generated by the disruption of the SLG tissues. These facts emerge from irrefutable histological evidence in the literature [4, 5, 6]. The trauma may be generated by intraoral activity such as eating, or dental and such-like instrumentation, or from external blunt trauma to the submandibular region. Herniation of the SLG through a...

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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