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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 491–497 | Cite as

Transoral Endoscopic Thyroidectomy Vestibular Approach: A Series of the First 60 Human Cases

  • Angkoon Anuwong
Original Scientific Report

Abstract

Background

Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery has been adopted for thyroid surgery because of its potential for scar-free operation. However, the previous technique still has some limitations. Thus, we present our initial experience in transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA).

Methods

From April 2014 to January 2015, we used a three-port technique through the oral vestibule, one 10-mm port for laparoscope and two additional 5-mm ports for instruments. The CO2 insufflation pressure was set at 6 mm Hg. An anterior cervical subplatysmal space was created from the oral vestibule down to the sternal notch. The thyroidectomy was done endoscopically using conventional laparoscopic instruments and an ultrasonic device.

Results

A series of 60 procedures were accomplished successfully. 42 patients had single-thyroid nodules, and a lobectomy was performed. 22 patients had multinodular goiters and two patients had Graves’ disease, with total thyroidectomy or Hartley-Dunhill procedures performed. Two had papillary thyroid carcinoma, and total thyroidectomy with central node dissection was performed. The median operative time was 115.5 min (range 75–300 min). The median blood loss was 30 mL (range 8–130 mL). Two patients experienced a transient hoarseness, which was resolved within 2 months. One patient experienced a late postoperative hematoma, which was treated conservatively. No mental nerve injury or infections were found. The patients were discharged in an average of 3.6 days (range 2–7 days) postoperatively.

Conclusion

TOETVA is safe and feasible, resulting in no visible scarring. This technique may provide a method for ideal cosmetic results.

Keywords

Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Total Thyroidectomy Multinodular Goiter Endoscopic Thyroidectomy Papillary Microcarcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

No grant support for this study.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

No conflict of interest in this study.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Police General Hospital, Faculty of MedicineSiam UniversityBangkokThailand

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