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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 40, Issue 1, pp 142–147 | Cite as

Duration of Smoking Cessation and Postoperative Morbidity After Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer: How Long Should Patients Stop Smoking Before Surgery?

  • Naoya Yoshida
  • Yoshifumi Baba
  • Yukiharu Hiyoshi
  • Hironobu Shigaki
  • Junji Kurashige
  • Yasuo Sakamoto
  • Yuji Miyamoto
  • Masaaki Iwatsuki
  • Takatsugu Ishimoto
  • Keisuke Kosumi
  • Hidetaka Sugihara
  • Kazuto Harada
  • Ryuma Tokunaga
  • Daisuke Izumi
  • Masayuki Watanabe
  • Hideo BabaEmail author
Original Scientific Report

Abstract

Background

Smoking is one of the risk factors for postoperative morbidity. There were no studies on the correlation between the duration of smoking cessation and the incidence of morbidities after esophagectomy.

Methods

A total of 246 patients undergoing elective esophagectomy with 2- or 3-field lymphadenectomy for esophageal cancer between April 2005 and February 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into five groups according to the duration of smoking cessation [no smoking cessation (including cessation for a few days), cessation for 7–30, 31–90, ≥91 days, never smoker].

Results

Any morbidity of Clavien–Dindo classification (CDc) ≥II, pneumonia, any pulmonary morbidity, surgical site infection, cardiovascular morbidity, and severe morbidities of CDc ≥IIIb frequently occurred in patients with no smoking cessation. The incidence of pneumonia and severe morbidities decreased as the duration of smoking cessation became longer. Logistic regression analysis suggested that no smoking cessation was the independent risk factor for any pulmonary morbidity (HR 3.68, 95 % CI 1.152–11.74; p = 0.028). Smoking cessation ≤30 days was also the independent risk factor for pneumonia (HR 2.89, 95 % CI 1.141–7.301; p = 0.025). Smoking cessation ≤90 days was the independent risk factor for severe morbidities of CDc ≥IIIb (HR 2.82, 95 % CI 1.072–7.427; p = 0.036).

Conclusions

Preoperative smoking cessation more than 90 days is ideal to reduce morbidities after esophagectomy. When patients with insufficient smoking cessation undergo esophagectomy, careful perioperative management is required.

Keywords

Smoking Cessation Esophageal Cancer Independent Risk Factor Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Surgical Site Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naoya Yoshida
    • 1
  • Yoshifumi Baba
    • 1
  • Yukiharu Hiyoshi
    • 1
  • Hironobu Shigaki
    • 1
  • Junji Kurashige
    • 1
  • Yasuo Sakamoto
    • 1
  • Yuji Miyamoto
    • 1
  • Masaaki Iwatsuki
    • 1
  • Takatsugu Ishimoto
    • 1
  • Keisuke Kosumi
    • 1
  • Hidetaka Sugihara
    • 1
  • Kazuto Harada
    • 1
  • Ryuma Tokunaga
    • 1
  • Daisuke Izumi
    • 1
  • Masayuki Watanabe
    • 2
  • Hideo Baba
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKumamoto UniversityKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryCancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer ResearchTokyoJapan

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