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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 38, Issue 12, pp 3041–3046 | Cite as

Surgical Needs of Nepal: Pilot Study of Population Based Survey in Pokhara, Nepal

  • Shailvi GuptaEmail author
  • Anju Ranjit
  • Ritesh Shrestha
  • Evan G. Wong
  • William C. Robinson
  • Sunil Shrestha
  • Benedict C. Nwomeh
  • Reinou S. Groen
  • Adam L. Kushner
Original Scientific Report

Abstract

Background

The Surgeons OverSeas assessment of surgical need (SOSAS) tool, a population-based survey on surgical conditions in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), was performed in Sierra Leone and Rwanda. This pilot study in Nepal is the initial implementation of the SOSAS survey in South Asia.

Methods

A pilot study of SOSAS, modified for Nepal’s needs and reprogrammed using mobile data collection software, was undertaken in Pokhara in January 2014. Cluster randomized sampling was utilized to interview 100 individuals in 50 households within two wards of Pokhara, one rural and one urban. The first portion of the survey retrieved demographic data, including household members and time to nearest health facilities. The second portion interviewed two randomly selected individuals from each household, inquiring about surgical conditions covering six anatomical regions.

Results

The pilot SOSAS in Nepal was easily completed over 3 days, including training of 18 Nepali interns over 2 days. The response rate was 100 %. A total of 13 respondents had a current surgical need (face 4, chest 1, back 1, abdomen 1, groin 3, extremity 3), although eight reported there was no need for surgical care. Five respondents (5 %) had a current unmet surgical need.

Conclusion

The SOSAS pilot study in Nepal was successfully conducted, demonstrating the feasibility of performing SOSAS in South Asia. The estimated 5 % current unmet surgical need will be used for sample size calculation for the full country survey. Utilizing and improving on the SOSAS tool to measure the prevalence of surgical conditions in Nepal will help enumerate the global surgical burden of disease.

Keywords

Manipal College Nepal Health Research Council Verbal Interview United Nations Human Development Countrywide Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shailvi Gupta
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Anju Ranjit
    • 1
  • Ritesh Shrestha
    • 4
  • Evan G. Wong
    • 1
    • 5
    • 3
  • William C. Robinson
    • 6
  • Sunil Shrestha
    • 4
  • Benedict C. Nwomeh
    • 7
    • 3
  • Reinou S. Groen
    • 8
    • 3
  • Adam L. Kushner
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Surgeons OverSeasNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryNepal Medical CollegeKathmanduNepal
  5. 5.The Centre for Global SurgeryMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  6. 6.Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthCenter for Refugee and Disaster ResponseBaltimoreUSA
  7. 7.Department of Pediatric SurgeryNationwide Children’s HospitalColumbusUSA
  8. 8.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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