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World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 486–487 | Cite as

Male Gender is a Risk Factor for Recurrent Appendicitis Following Nonoperative Treatment

  • Salomone Di SaverioEmail author
  • Federico Coccolini
  • Michele Pisano
  • Fausto Catena
  • Elio Jovine
  • Gregorio Tugnoli
  • Luca Ansaloni
Article

To the Editor,

We read with great interest the article by Lien et al. [1] in which the authors analyzed a cohort of 128 patients with appendicitis. The method of patient selection is not reliable, however, because it is not randomized and “the patients decided whether to receive operative or non-operative treatment, after the staff surgeons explained advantages and risks of surgical intervention and non-operative treatment based on their age and medical status.” Possible bias could result from such patient selection (not based on randomization). Also, such a study would ideally be a prospective observation, which should include only consecutive and unselected patients with the same diagnosis. Also relevant is the way the treating surgeon explained risk and benefits of the two treatment options, as this information might affect a patient’s choice.

Further, in defining differences in recurrence between males and females in the series, no data are given regarding possible significant...

Keywords

Endometriosis Appendicitis Acute Appendicitis High Recurrence Rate Pelvic Inflammatory Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Lien WC, Lee WC, Wang HP et al (2011) Male gender is a risk factor for recurrent appendicitis following nonoperative treatment. World J Surg 35:1636–1642PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Graff L, Russel J, Seashore J et al (2000) False-negative and false-positive errors in abdominal pain evaluation: failure to diagnose acute appendicitis and unnecessary surgery. Acad Emerg Med 7:1244–1255PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Seetahal SA, Bolorunduro OB, Sookdeo TC et al (2011) Negative appendectomy: a 10-year review of nationally representative sample. Am J Surg 201:433–437PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Ansaloni L, Catena F, Coccolini F et al (2010) Conservative management of acute appendicitis. J Gastrointest Surg 14:931–932 author reply 933PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Ansaloni L, Catena F, Coccolini F et al (2011) Surgery versus conservative antibiotic treatment in acute appendicitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Dig Surg 28:210–221PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Tugnoli G, Giorgini E, Biscardi A, et al. (2011) The NOTA study: non-operative treatment for acute appendicitis: prospective study on the efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatment (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid) in patients with right sided lower abdominal pain. BMJ Open. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2010-0000
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    Kaminski A, Liu IA, Applebaum H et al (2005) Routine interval appendectomy is not justified after initial nonoperative treatment of acute appendicitis. Arch Surg 140:897–901PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salomone Di Saverio
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Federico Coccolini
    • 4
  • Michele Pisano
    • 4
  • Fausto Catena
    • 1
  • Elio Jovine
    • 2
  • Gregorio Tugnoli
    • 3
  • Luca Ansaloni
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of General and Transplant SurgeryEmergency Surgery Unit, S. Orsola Malpighi University HospitalBolognaItaly
  2. 2.General and Emergency Surgery, Maggiore HospitalBolognaItaly
  3. 3.Trauma Surgery Unit, Maggiore Hospital Trauma CenterBolognaItaly
  4. 4.General Surgery I DepartmentOspedali RiunitiBergamoItaly

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