World Journal of Surgery

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 245–248 | Cite as

Transmetatarsal Amputation: Three-year Experience At Groote Schuur Hospital

  • B.P. Mwipatayi
  • N.G. Naidoo
  • P.C. Jeffery
  • C.D. Maraspini
  • M.Z. Adams
  • N. Cloete
Article

Abstract

Transmetatarsal amputation (TMA) for peripheral vascular disease has the reputation of being an operation with a poor outcome. This retrospective study reviewed a 3-year consecutive series of TMA in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. All amputations performed for peripheral vascular disease at Groote Schuur Hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were reviewed. Data were obtained from hospital records and operating theatre books. The following groups were defined for the purpose of this retrospective study: group 1, TMAs performed in diabetic patients; group 2, TMAs done in nondiabetic patients. Altogether, 43 TMAs were performed: 27 in group 1 and 16 in group 2. Perioperative mortality rates were 7% and 4%, respectively. Overall, the healing rate was 67%: 62% (17/27) in group 1 and 75% (12/16) in group 2. The median times to healing were 8 months in group 1 and 7 months in group 2. Toe pressure and the presence of advanced tibioperoneal disease influenced the outcome of TMA in diabetic patients.

Transmetatarsal amputation with a healed stump provided our patients with good mobility. Prediction of healing after operation is unreliable. There was no statistical difference in outcome in diabetic (group 1) versus nondiabetic (group 2) patients.

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Copyright information

© Société Internationale de Chirurgie 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • B.P. Mwipatayi
    • 1
    • 4
  • N.G. Naidoo
    • 1
  • P.C. Jeffery
    • 1
  • C.D. Maraspini
    • 2
  • M.Z. Adams
    • 3
  • N. Cloete
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Vascular UnitGroote Schuur Hospital/University of Cape TownCape TownSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryGroote Schuur Hospital/University of Cape TownCape TownSouth Africa
  3. 3.Orthotic and Prosthetic UnitConradie HospitalCape TownSouth Africa
  4. 4.Department of Vascular SurgeryRoyal Perth HospitalPerthAustralia

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