Environmental Management

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 593–602 | Cite as

Conservation, Conflict and the Governance of Fisher Wellbeing: Analysis of the Establishment of the Gulf of Mannar National Park and Biosphere Reserve

Article

Abstract

This article examines one MPA—the Gulf of Mannar National Park and Biosphere Reserve—located in southern India, and four types of social conflict that have surrounded its establishment. Taking the strength of wellbeing aspirations as point of departure, we focus on two themes: the implications of MPA embeddedness in wider societal systems, and the consequences of natural and social variety for governance. We conclude first of all that conflict resolution depends on MPA authorities’ willingness to engage with the interferences that emerge from outside the MPA area. Secondly, we point out the varying wellbeing aspirations of the population and the need to develop governance partnerships. The latter are argued to contribute to more balanced decision making, as well as to a greater appreciation among the target population of the ‘fairness’ of MPA policy.

Keywords

Marine Protected Area India Gulf of Mannar Governance Wellbeing Conflict 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of AmsterdamAmsterdamNetherlands
  2. 2.Fisheries Management Resource Centre (FishMARC)TrivandrumIndia

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