Environmental Management

, 43:645

Linking Theory and Practice for Restoration of Step-Pool Streams

  • Anne Chin
  • Shannah Anderson
  • Andrew Collison
  • Barbara J. Ellis-Sugai
  • Jeffrey P. Haltiner
  • Johan B. Hogervorst
  • G. Mathias Kondolf
  • Linda S. O’Hirok
  • Alison H. Purcell
  • Ann L. Riley
  • Ellen Wohl
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00267-008-9171-x

Cite this article as:
Chin, A., Anderson, S., Collison, A. et al. Environmental Management (2009) 43: 645. doi:10.1007/s00267-008-9171-x

Abstract

Step-pools sequences are increasingly used to restore stream channels. This increase corresponds to significant advances in theory for step-pools in recent years. The need for step-pools in stream restoration arises as urban development encroaches into steep terrain in response to population pressures, as stream channels in lower-gradient areas require stabilization due to hydrological alterations associated with land-use changes, and as step-pools are recognized for their potential to enhance stream habitats. Despite an increasingly voluminous literature and great demand for restoration using step-pool sequences, however, the link between theory and practice is limited. In this article, we present four unique cases of stream restoration using step-pools, including the evolution of the approaches, the project designs, and adjustments in the system following restoration. Baxter Creek in El Cerrito, California demonstrates an early application of artificial step-pools in which natural adjustments occurred toward geomorphic stability and ecological improvement. Restoration of East Alamo Creek in a large residential development near San Ramon, California illustrates an example of step-pools increasingly used in locations where such a channel form would not naturally occur. Construction of a step-pool channel in Karnowsky Creek within the Siuslaw National Forest, Oregon overcame constraints posed by access and the type and availability of materials; the placement of logs allowed natural scouring below steps. Dry Canyon Creek on the property of the Mountains Restoration Trust in Calabasas, California afforded a somewhat experimental approach to designing step-pools, allowing observation and learning in the future. These cases demonstrate how theories and relationships developed for step-pool sequences over the past two decades have been applied in real-world settings. The lessons from these examples enable us to develop considerations useful for deriving an appropriate course of design, approval, and construction of artificial step-pool systems. They also raise additional fundamental questions concerning appropriate strategies for restoration of step-pool streams. Outstanding challenges are highlighted as opportunities for continuing theoretical work.

Keywords

Step-pools River restoration Environmental management Human impacts Channel design 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Chin
    • 1
  • Shannah Anderson
    • 2
  • Andrew Collison
    • 3
  • Barbara J. Ellis-Sugai
    • 4
  • Jeffrey P. Haltiner
    • 3
  • Johan B. Hogervorst
    • 5
  • G. Mathias Kondolf
    • 2
  • Linda S. O’Hirok
    • 6
  • Alison H. Purcell
    • 7
  • Ann L. Riley
    • 8
  • Ellen Wohl
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of Geography, College of GeosciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental PlanningUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.Philip Williams & Associates, Ltd.San FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.Siuslaw National ForestUnited States Forest ServiceCorvallis USA
  5. 5.Willamette National Forest, United States Forest Service EugeneUSA
  6. 6.Department of Geography and Urban AnalysisCalifornia State UniversityLos AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Department of Environmental and Natural Resource SciencesHumboldt State UniversityArcataUSA
  8. 8.Waterways Restoration InstituteBerkeleyUSA
  9. 9.Department of GeosciencesColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

Personalised recommendations