Environmental Management

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 122–131 | Cite as

Assessment of Economic and Water Quality Impacts of Land Use Change Using a Simple Bioeconomic Model

  • Gandhi Bhattarai
  • Puneet Srivastava
  • Luke Marzen
  • Diane Hite
  • Upton Hatch
Article

Abstract

The objective of this study is to assess the economic and water quality impact of land use change in a small watershed in the Wiregrass region of Alabama. The study compares changes in water quality and revenue from agricultural and timber production due to changes in land use between years 1992 and 2001. The study was completed in two stages. In the first stage, a biophysical model was used to estimate the effect of land use change on nitrogen and phosphorus runoff and sediment deposition in the main channel; in the second stage, farm enterprise budgeting tools were used to estimate the economic returns for the changes in land use condition. Both biophysical and economic results are discussed, and a case for complex optimization to develop a decision support system is presented.

Keywords

Water quality Bioeconomic modeling Land use change 

References

  1. Alabama Agricultural Statistics (2005) Alabama Agricultural Statistics ServiceGoogle Scholar
  2. Alabama Cooperative Extension System (2005) Budges for Major Forage Crop Enterprises in Alabama. AEC BUD 1-2 May 2005Google Scholar
  3. Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Major Row Crop Enterprise Planning Budget Summaries, Alabama 2006. AEC BUD 1-1 January 2006Google Scholar
  4. Arnold JG, Muttiah RS, Srinivasan R, Allen PM (2000) Regional Estimation of Base Flow and Groundwater Recharge in the Upper Mississippi River Basin. Journal of Hydrology 227(2000):21–40CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bhuyan SJ, Marzen LJ, Koelliker JK, Harrington JA, Barnes PL (2001) Assessment of Runoff and Sediment Yield Using Remote Sensing, GIS and AGNPS. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 57(5):351–364Google Scholar
  6. Borah DK, Bera M (2003) SWAT Model Background and Application Reviews. Paper presented at American Society for Engineering in Agricultural, Food, and Biological Systems Annual International Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada. July 2003Google Scholar
  7. DiLuzio M, Srinivasan R, Arnold JG, Neitsch SL (2002) ArcView Interface for SWAT2000: User’s Guide. TWRI Report TR-193, Texas Water Resources Institute, Texas. 2002Google Scholar
  8. Fisher TR, Lee KY, Berdnt H, Benitez JA, Norton MM (1998) Hydrology and Chemistry of Choptank River Basin. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 105:387–397CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fohrer N, Haverkamp S, Frede HG (2005) Assessment of the Effects of Land Use Patterns on Hydrologic Functions: Development of Sustainable Land Use Concepts for Low Mountain Range Areas. Hydrological Processes 19:659–672CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Forster DL, Smith E, Hite D (2000) A Bioeconomic Model of Farm Management Practices and Environmental Effluents in the Western Lake Erie Basin. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 55(2):177–182, 2nd Quarter, 2000Google Scholar
  11. Hite, D. W. Intarapapong, Isik M (2002) A Watershed-Based Bioeconomic Model of Best Management Practices in Mississippi in Translation of a Regional Effort to a National Program Objective: The Mississippi Delta Management Systems Evaluation Area. Oxford University Press (ACS Books)Google Scholar
  12. Homer C, Huang C, Yang L, Wylie B, Coan M (2004) Development of a 2001 National Land-Cover Database for the United States. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 70(7):829–840Google Scholar
  13. Homer C, Huang C, Yang L, Wylie B, Coan M (2004) Development of a 2001 National Land-Cover Database for the United States. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing 70(7):829–840Google Scholar
  14. Intarapapong W, Hite D, Reinschmiedt L (2002) Water Quality Impacts of Conservation Agricultural Practices in the Mississippi Delta. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 38(2):507–515, April 2002CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Krisch K, Kirsch A, Arnold JG (2002) Predicting Sediment and Phosphorus Loads in the Rock River Basin Using SWAT. Transactions of the ASAE 45(6):1757–1769Google Scholar
  16. Larose M, Heathman GC, Norton LD, Engel B (2007) Hydrologic and Atrazine Simulation of the Cedar Creek Watershed Using the SWAT Model. Journal of Environmental Quality 36(2):521–531CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Mankin KR, Koelliker JK, Kalita PK (1999) Watershed and Lake Water Quality Assessment: An Integrated Modeling Approach. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 35(5):1069–1080CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Marzen LJ, Bhuyan SJ, Harrington JA, Koelliker JK, Frees LD, Volkman CG (2000) Water Quality Modeling in the Red Rock Creek Watershed, Kansas. Proceedings of the Applied Geography Conference 23:175–182Google Scholar
  19. Mississippi University Extension Service, MSUCARES. MTN 9C Forest Economics and Finance. http://msucares.com/forestry/economics/economic.html
  20. Moon J, Srinivasan R, Jacobs JH (2004) Streamflow Estimation Using Spatially Distributed Rainfall in the Trinity River Basin, Texas. Transactions of the ASAE 47(5):1445–1451Google Scholar
  21. Nash JE, Sutcliffe JV (1970) River flow forecasting through conceptual models part I–a discussion of principles. Journal of Hydrology 10(3):282–290CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. National Assessment Synthesis Team (2000) Climate Change Impacts on the United States: The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. US Global Change Research Program, 400 Virginia Avenue, Washington DCGoogle Scholar
  23. Neitsch SL, Arnold JG, Kiniry JR, Srinivasan R, Williams JR (2002) Soil and Water Assessment Tool: User’s Guide, Version 2000. Texas Water Resources Institute, College Station, Texas, TWRI Report TR-192Google Scholar
  24. Paudel K, Intarapapong W, Hite D, Susanto D A Watershed Based Economic Model of Alternative Management Practices in Southern Agricultural Systems. Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics JAAE 35(2)):381–89, August 2003Google Scholar
  25. Saleh A, Arnold JG, Gassman PW, Hauck LW, Rosenthal WD, Williams RR, McFarland AMS (2000). Application of SWAT for the upper north Bosque Watershed. Transactions of the ASAE 43(5):1077–1087Google Scholar
  26. Santhi C, Arnold JG, Williams JR, Dugus WA, Srinivasan R, Hauck LM (2001) Validation of the SWAT Model on a Large River Basin with Point and Nonpoint Sources. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 37(5):1169–1188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Stehman SV, Wickham JD, Smith JH, Yang L (2003) Thematic Accuracy of the 1992 National Land-Cover Data for the Eastern United States: Statistical Methodology and Regional Results. Remote Sensing of Environment 86(2003):500–516CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Stehman SV, Wickham JD, Smith JH, Yang L (2003) Thematic Accuracy of the 1992 National Land-Cover Data for the Eastern United States: Statistical Methodology and Regional Results. Remote Sensing of Environment 86(2003):500–516CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Office of Water (1998) “National Water Quality Inventory: 1996 Report to Congress.” Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  30. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USSEPA) (2001) Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources. BASINS Users’ manual, Version 3.0Google Scholar
  31. USGS Seamless Data Distribution system, National Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS). Online at: http://seamless.usgs.gov/website/seamless/index.asp

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gandhi Bhattarai
    • 1
  • Puneet Srivastava
    • 2
  • Luke Marzen
    • 2
  • Diane Hite
    • 2
  • Upton Hatch
    • 3
  1. 1.United Health Group, INGENIX Pharmacy Analytic StrategiesRocky HillUSA
  2. 2.Auburn UniversityAuburnUSA
  3. 3.North Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

Personalised recommendations