Environmental Management

, Volume 31, Issue 5, pp 0561–0568

Volunteer Environmental Monitoring and the Role of the Universities: The Case of Citizens' Environment Watch

  • BETH SAVAN
  • ALEXIS J. MORGAN
  • CHRISTOPHER GORE

DOI: 10.1007/s00267-002-2897-y

Cite this article as:
SAVAN, B., MORGAN, A. & GORE, C. Environmental Management (2003) 31: 0561. doi:10.1007/s00267-002-2897-y

Abstract

Universities can provide a stable home for launching collaborative community research projects. Citizens' Environment Watch (CEW), an environmental monitoring initiative based at the University of Toronto, has made significant contributions to environmental education and stewardship in Ontario, Canada. Following dramatic cuts in provincial monitoring programs, citizens and youth have used chemical parameters and biological indicators to gauge water and air quality, and to identify areas requiring remediation and pollution prevention efforts. The relationship of Citizens' Environment Watch to government agencies, funders and other grassroots environmental groups has evolved over the past 5 years as CEW attempts to remain effective without taking on the investigative and enforcement roles to support the regulatory enforcement that has been largely abandoned by government. We explore the challenges inherent in developing and maintaining a volunteer organization that carries out rigorous and useful scientific work and we outline the ability of a university to help overcome these critical challenges. Finally, we present lessons learned for the benefit of other citizen and youth monitoring projects.

KEY WORDS: Community; Monitoring; Volunteers; Partnerships; Environmental education; Stewardship 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • BETH SAVAN
    • 1
  • ALEXIS J. MORGAN
    • 2
  • CHRISTOPHER GORE
    • 3
  1. 1.Environmental Studies, Innis College, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1J5, CanadaCA
  2. 2.M.Sc. Candidate, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto, Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G3, CanadaCA
  3. 3.Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Political Science and Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Toronto, Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, CanadaCA

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