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International Orthopaedics

, Volume 42, Issue 12, pp 2807–2815 | Cite as

Mobilization with movement and kinesio taping in knee arthritis—evaluation and outcomes

  • Hülya Altmış
  • Deran Oskay
  • Bülent Elbasan
  • İrem Düzgün
  • Zeynep Tuna
Original Paper

Abstract

Introduction

The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of Mulligan mobilization with movement (MwM) and taping on function and pain intensity in patients with osteoarthritis (OA).

Materials and methods

Female patients aged between 40 and 70 years with knee OA participated in the study. The patients were divided into three groups and each group received different interventions. Group 1 received MwM and taping according to Mulligan’s concept. Group 2 received MwM and placebo taping with no recovery effect and group 3 received placebo taping. Functional tests including lifting, picking up, sit and stand-up, socket tests in addition to climbing up and down stairs, ten metres walk, and timed up and go (TUG) tests were performed before and after intervention. Pain during the test performances were assessed by a visual analog scale.

Results

Performance in all tests improved significantly in the MwM + taping group, while only sit and stand-up, ten metres walk, and TUG test performances improved in the MwM + placebo taping group (p < 0.05). Pain intensity during the tests was also significantly better after intervention in those two groups (p < 0.05). Comparison between the groups showed that the pain intensity during all tests was less and functional test scores were better in sit and stand-up, ten metres walk, and walking down stairs in the MwM + taping group than the MwM + placebo taping group.

Conclusions

MwM accompanied by taping improves pain during functional activities as well as the performance. MwM without taping may also improve pain intensity; however, it may be inadequate in increasing the performance.

Keywords

Mobilization Knee Osteoarthritis Taping 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© SICOT aisbl 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hülya Altmış
    • 1
  • Deran Oskay
    • 2
  • Bülent Elbasan
    • 2
  • İrem Düzgün
    • 3
  • Zeynep Tuna
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Health SciencesGazi UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy and RehabilitationGazi UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  3. 3.Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy and RehabilitationHacettepe UniversityAnkaraTurkey

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