International Orthopaedics

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 129–133 | Cite as

Antibiotic-loaded bone cement spacers in two-stage management of infected total knee arthroplasty

Review Article

Abstract

We reviewed the current use of spacers in the management of the infected knee prosthesis. There are two types of temporary spacers: block or non-articulating spacers and articulating or mobile spacers. Generally, spacers improve mobilisation and hasten recovery with shorter hospital stay between stages. Furthermore, spacers facilitate the second-stage procedure by maintaining joint space, and articulating spacers may also maintain range of motion. Last but not the least, the cost of spacers represents only a small fraction of the total expenses for management of infected knee arthroplasties.

Résumé

Nous avons examiné l’usage courant d’espaceurs dans la gestion de la prothèse du genou infectée. Il y a deux types d’espaceurs temporaires: articulants ou non. Généralement les espaceurs améliorent la mobilisation et hâtent la récupération des malades, avec un plus court séjour d’hospitalisation entre les deux étapes. En outre, ils les facilitent le deuxième temps chirurgical en maintenant l’espace articulaire et les espaceurs articulants peuvent aussi maintenir une gamme de mouvement. Dernier avantage, et non le moindre, le coût des espaceurs représente seulement une petite fraction des dépenses totales pour la gestion des arthroplasties du genou infectées.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, South Auckland Clinical SchoolUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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