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Abdominal Radiology

, Volume 43, Issue 7, pp 1535–1539 | Cite as

Three cases of intracystic papillary neoplasm of gallbladder

  • Naruki Mizobuchi
  • Jiro Munechika
  • Nobuyuki Takeyama
  • Yoshimitsu Ohgiya
  • Nobuyuki Ohike
  • Ryosuke Abe
  • Noritsugu Takahama
  • Osamu Miyagami
  • Kumi Hatano
  • Kumiko Ishizuka
  • Masanori Hirose
  • Takehiko Gokan
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Abstract

Intracystic papillary neoplasm (ICPN) of gallbladder is a comparatively new concept and is described as pre-malignant lesions in Nakanuma et al. (In: Bosman et al. (eds) WHO Classification of Tumours of the Digestive System, World Health Organization of Tumours, IARC, Lyon, 2010). ICPN with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia is understood to include intraepithelial carcinoma or noninvasive carcinoma. And lesions with invasive cancer components are classified as ICPN with an associated invasive carcinoma [1]. According to Adsay et al., more than half of patients diagnosed with ICPN have invasive cancer components (Adsay et al., Am J Surg Pathol 36:1279–1301, 2012).

Polypoid masses in the gallbladder including benign, malignant, and non-neoplastic lesions have been called gallbladder polyps, and ICPN is also a polypoid lesion in the gallbladder. However, it is difficult to differentiate between them. In the literature, it is said that the possibility of malignancy is high in lesions exceeding 1 cm (Terzi et al., Surgery 127:622–627, 2000). And there are few reports on characteristic imaging findings of ICPN.

We have experienced three cases (two females and one male) of ICPN and report our imaging findings. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed large papillary polypoid lesions approximately 2–4 cm in size in the gallbladder. Findings suggestive of deformation of the gallbladder wall and extrinsic progression were absent in all cases. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed intense signals and diffusion-weighted imaging showed high intensity. Expanding of the gallbladder was seen in case 1, and a tumor stalk-like appearance was seen in the papillary mass in cases 2 and 3. Surgery was performed in all three cases and ICPN was diagnosed pathologically. The cancer was localized to the mucosa, with no infiltration of surrounding tissue in all three cases.

Keywords

Intracystic papillary neoplasm (ICPN) CT MRI 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the Ethical Standards of the Institutional and National Research Committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naruki Mizobuchi
    • 1
  • Jiro Munechika
    • 1
  • Nobuyuki Takeyama
    • 2
  • Yoshimitsu Ohgiya
    • 1
  • Nobuyuki Ohike
    • 3
  • Ryosuke Abe
    • 1
  • Noritsugu Takahama
    • 1
  • Osamu Miyagami
    • 1
  • Kumi Hatano
    • 1
  • Kumiko Ishizuka
    • 1
  • Masanori Hirose
    • 1
  • Takehiko Gokan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, School of MedicineShowa UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyShowa University Fujigaoka HospitalYokohamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of PathologyShowa University Fujigaoka HospitalYokohamaJapan

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