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Cardiac 82rubidium PET/CT: initial European experience

  • Ashley M. Groves
  • Marie-Elsya Speechly-Dick
  • John C. Dickson
  • Irfan Kayani
  • Raymondo Endozo
  • Patty Blanchard
  • Manu Shastry
  • Elizabeth Prvulovich
  • Wendy A. Waddington
  • Simona Ben-Haim
  • Jamshed B. Bomanji
  • Jean R. McEwan
  • Peter J. Ell
Original article

Abstract

Purpose

Myocardial perfusion with PET/CT has advantages over conventional SPECT. We describe our initial European experience using 82Rubidium-PET/CT, as part of a clinical myocardial perfusion service.

Methods

We studied the first 100 patients (64 male; 36 female, mean age = 60: SD +/−12.5y, mean body mass index = 30: SD +/−6.9kg/m 2 ) who underwent 82Rubidium cardiac PET/CT in our institution. Thirty patients had recently undergone coronary angiography. Patients underwent imaging during adenosine infusion and at rest. Images were acquired over 5 minutes using a GE-PET/CT instrument. Image quality was described as good, adequate or inadequate. Images were reported patient-by-patient by a minimum of five nuclear medicine physicians. A segment-by-segment analysis (17-segment model) was also performed.

Results

Image quality was good in 77%, adequate 23% and inadequate 0%. There was no statistical difference in image quality between obese and non-obese patients (Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.2864). 59% had normal perfusion studies, 29% had inducible ischaemia, 12% had myocardial infarction (11% with super added ischaemia). There was reduced 82Rubidium uptake in 132/1700 segments during stress. There was reduced 82Rubidium uptake at rest in 42/1700 segments. The 82Rubidium PET/CT findings were consistent with the angiographic findings in 28/30 cases.

Conclusion

We show that, even from initial use of 82Rubidium, it is possible to perform myocardial perfusion studies quickly with good image quality, even in the obese. The PET findings correlated well in the third of the cases where angiography was available. As such, 82Rubidium cardiac PET/CT is likely to be an exciting addition to the European nuclear physician/ cardiologist’s radionuclide imaging arsenal.

Keywords

Cardiac PET Cardiology Perfusion 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was undertaken at UCLH/UCL, who received a proportion of funding from the UK Department of Health’s NIHR Biomedical Research Centres funding scheme.

We would also like to thank Dr Carolyn Corn (Oklahoma Heart Hospital), Mrs Caroline Townsend, Mrs Heidi Batchelor, and Prof Brian Hutton (UCL/UCLH) for their contribution to the work.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ashley M. Groves
    • 1
  • Marie-Elsya Speechly-Dick
    • 2
  • John C. Dickson
    • 1
  • Irfan Kayani
    • 1
  • Raymondo Endozo
    • 1
  • Patty Blanchard
    • 1
  • Manu Shastry
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Prvulovich
    • 1
  • Wendy A. Waddington
    • 1
  • Simona Ben-Haim
    • 1
  • Jamshed B. Bomanji
    • 1
  • Jean R. McEwan
    • 2
  • Peter J. Ell
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Nuclear MedicineUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Institute of CardiologyUniversity College Hospitals NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK

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