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Osteomyelitis of a sacral neurocentral synchondrosis: a case report of another metaphyseal equivalent

  • Osamu Miyazaki
  • Mikiko Miyasaka
  • Reiko Okamoto
  • Yoshiyuki Tsutsumi
  • Shunsuke Nosaka
Case Report
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Abstract

Pelvic osteomyelitis may occur in a metaphyseal equivalent, defined as a portion of flat or irregular bone that is adjacent to cartilage. The pelvic bone is known to have several metaphyseal equivalents and of these, the sacroiliac joint is the most frequent site of involvement. However, a sacral neurocentral synchondrosis has not been recognized as a metaphyseal equivalent, and there have been no previous reports describing this as the site of origin of sacral osteomyelitis. We here report two cases of sacral osteomyelitis originating in a neurocentral synchondrosis, another metaphyseal equivalent. We, as pediatric radiologists, should recognize a sacral neurocentral synchondrosis as another metaphyseal equivalent, especially in infants and younger patients.

Keywords

Osteomyelitis Metaphyseal equivalent Neurocentral synchondrosis 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© ISS 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of RadiologyNational Center for Child Health and DevelopmentTokyoJapan

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