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Skeletal Radiology

, Volume 48, Issue 1, pp 159–162 | Cite as

Case report: Broad insertion of a large subscapularis tendon in association with congenital absence of the long head of the biceps tendon

  • Jad M. El Abiad
  • Daniel G. Faddoul
  • Hasan Baydoun
Case Report
  • 88 Downloads

Abstract

Congenital absence of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is a rare variation in shoulder anatomy. The authors present a case of congenital absence of the long head of the biceps tendon associated with a large insertion of the subscapularis muscle. The patient initially presented with shoulder pain on overhead activity. Shoulder examination was negative for signs of a torn biceps tendon. MRI revealed congenital absence of the LHB tendon, a rim rent tear of the supraspinatus, and a large insertion of the subscapularis muscle. This is the first reported case describing a large insertion of the subscapularis muscle associated with absence of the LHB tendon.5

Keywords

Long head of biceps tendon Congenital absence Congenital absence of long head of biceps tendon Subscapularis Large subscapularis insertion Shoulder Magnetic resonance imaging 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© ISS 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jad M. El Abiad
    • 1
  • Daniel G. Faddoul
    • 2
  • Hasan Baydoun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryAmerican University of Beirut Medical CenterBeirutLebanon
  2. 2.Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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